Jesus Research: New Methodologies and Perceptions : the Second Princeton-Prague Symposium on Jesus Research, Princeton 2007

Jesus Research: New Methodologies and Perceptions : the Second Princeton-Prague Symposium on Jesus Research, Princeton 2007

Jesus Research: New Methodologies and Perceptions : the Second Princeton-Prague Symposium on Jesus Research, Princeton 2007

Jesus Research: New Methodologies and Perceptions : the Second Princeton-Prague Symposium on Jesus Research, Princeton 2007

Synopsis

This volume explores nearly every facet of contemporary Jesus research -- from eyewitness criteria to the reliability of memory, from archaeology to psychobiography, from oral traditions to literary sources.

With contributions from forty internationally respected Jewish and Christian scholars, this distinguished collection of articles comes from the second (2007) Princeton-Prague Symposium on Jesus Research. It summarizes the significant advances in understanding Jesus that scholars have made in recent years through the development of diverse methodologies.

Readers already knowledgeable in the field will discover unique angles from well-known scholars, and all will be amply informed on the current state of Jesus studies.

Excerpt

An increasing number of scholars, representing many divergent disciplines and perspectives, distinguish “Jesus Research” from “the Third Quest of the Historical Jesus.” the latter is dominated by New Testament scholars and tends to be theologically driven. the former, “Jesus Research,” is an academic discipline that attracts theologians, archaeologists, historians, numismatics, paleographers, geographers, specialists in oral history, sociologists, and specialists in psychobiography. Roman Catholics, Protestants, Jews, secularists, and others engage in research on the historical Jesus. the worldwide recognition that Jesus Research should be enriched by all pertinent data (archaeological realia and all ancient texts) and all scientific methodologies led to the agenda of the Second Princeton-Prague Symposium. This congress was held in Princeton, April 18-21, 2007, with the support of President Iain Torrance. Those who attended the sessions constituted a “Who’s Who” of specialists in Jesus Research, offering papers on diverse methodological approaches to the historical Jesus.

Historical and scholarly work is characterized by self-critical methodologies. It is not enough to ask questions and offer answers. Careful attention must be given to the presuppositions behind any question. We should contemplate and share our decisions of what to include and what is to take priority. Then we should use all methodologies refined before we come to any conclusion. Scholarly work follows a scientific method in asking historical, archaeological, literary, and theological questions. Most scholars who focus their research on the historical Jesus acknowledge that the historical-critical method needs to be employed. Unfortunately, in the past, few scholars de-

I appreciate the assistance that Brian Rhea provided in helping me craft this introduction.

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