Death Waits in the "Dark": The Senoi Praaq, Malaysia's Killer Elite

Death Waits in the "Dark": The Senoi Praaq, Malaysia's Killer Elite

Death Waits in the "Dark": The Senoi Praaq, Malaysia's Killer Elite

Death Waits in the "Dark": The Senoi Praaq, Malaysia's Killer Elite

Synopsis

The Senoi Praaq is a Malaysian special forces unit originally created in 1956 by the British colonial authorities to fight communism during the Malayan Emergency. The term Senoi Praaq, which roughly translates as war people, stems from the Semai language and is the basis of a colorful legend in Malaysia. The unit is largely comprised of non-Malay tribal peoples known collectively as the Orang Asli of Peninsular Malaysia. Jumper details Senoi Praaq inception as a private army and its subsequent development into an affiliate of the Royal Malaysian Police (RMP) in this fast paced and often graphic account of irregular warfare as it applies to counterinsurgency.

The unit began as a creature of British Military Intelligence and fought in the deep jungle as Special Air Service (SAS) proteges, eventually replacing the latter upon Malaysian independence from Great Britain. They then served as mercenaries employed by the United States Central Intelligence Agency in Vietnam and later fought on Borneo during Malaysia's own undeclared war with Indonesia. Today the unit remains under arms and heads up a large paramilitary apparatus maintained in conjunction with conventional military forces. Malaysia's capacity to project force throughout South East Asia should not be underestimated, Jumper warns. The Senoi Praaq is a unique fighting force upon which Malaysia may rely to preserve her sovereignty.

Excerpt

Death Waits in the “Dark” brings to light with great clarity the legend of heroic exploits by Malaysia’s unique paramilitary fighting force, the Senoi Praaq. This remarkable study takes the reader into peninsular Malaysia’s tortuous jungle where Senoi Praaq troopers successfully engaged communist terrorists in protracted, yet defining, battle for control of the newly independent state; then to the war in central Vietnam where a contingent of Senoi Praaq troopers and British officers sought to build a fire wall among indigenous mountain tribes in a secretive, failed attempt to shut down the progression of Viet Cong fighters into South Vietnam’s southern and eastern provinces; and finally, to the island of Borneo and to the southmost states of Malaysia’s mainland where the trooially have yet to heal. the Middle East tragedy was not limited to one people, as suffering knows no boundaries. But as the long-awaited peace . . .

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