Darwinism, an Exponent of the Theory of Natural Selection, with Some of Its Applications

Darwinism, an Exponent of the Theory of Natural Selection, with Some of Its Applications

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Darwinism, an Exponent of the Theory of Natural Selection, with Some of Its Applications

Darwinism, an Exponent of the Theory of Natural Selection, with Some of Its Applications

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The present work treats the problem of the Origin of Species on the same general lines as were adopted by Darwin ; but from the standpoint reached after nearly thirty years of discussion, with an abundance of new facts and the advocacy of many new or old theories.

While not attempting to deal, even in outline, with the vast subject of evolution in general, an endeavour has been made to give such an account of the theory of Natural Selection as may enable any intelligent reader to obtain a clear conception of Darwin’s work, and to understand something of the power and range of his great principle.

Darwin wrote for a generation which had not accepted evolution, and which poured contempt on those who upheld the derivation of species from species by any natural law of descent. He did his work so well that “descent with mre in the organic world; and the rising generation of naturalists can hardly realise the novelty of this idea, or that their fathers considered it a scientific heresy to be condemned rather than seriously discussed.

The objections now made to Darwin’s theory apply, solely, to the particular means by which the change of species has been brought about, not to the fact of that change. the objectors seek to minimise the agency of natural selection and to subordinate it to laws of variation, of use and disuse, of intelligence, and of heredity. These views and objections . . .

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