Managing Information Technology Projects: Applying Project Management Strategies to Software, Hardware, and Integration Initiatives

Managing Information Technology Projects: Applying Project Management Strategies to Software, Hardware, and Integration Initiatives

Managing Information Technology Projects: Applying Project Management Strategies to Software, Hardware, and Integration Initiatives

Managing Information Technology Projects: Applying Project Management Strategies to Software, Hardware, and Integration Initiatives

Synopsis

With software and hardware development techniques improving constantly, it's surprising to learn that more than half of all technology projects overrun their schedules and budgets by 200 percent or more. Computerworld magazine recently reported several surveys showing that project failure is overwhelmingly traceable to poorly defined project organization, a lack of training, weak executive support, inconsistent methods and policies, and other readily addressed factors. Managing Information Technology Projects gives systems project managers field-proven tools and step-by-step methodologies to start and complete every project - hardware, software, or integration - within prescribed parameters. Coverage includes: • Organizing information technology project teams and developing project plans • Risk management issues for IT projects • Systems engineering • Customer requirements and service • Project monitoring, control, closeout, and assessment" "

Excerpt

Studies consistently show that 80–90 percent of all software and 30–45 percent of all systems projects fail. Moreover, over half of all systems projects overrun their budgets and schedules by up to 200 percent or more. of the projects that fail, approximately half of all those that are restarted fail again. Yet management tools and techniques, as well as software development techniques, are constantly improving. What are the causes of these expensive and seemingly uncontrollable failures?

One explanation for these high failure rates lies in the definition of failure. To a developer or an engineer, a project may be successful if the deliverables are provided to the customer regardless of schedule or budget considerations. Senior management may consider the same project a failure if it does not turn a profit, even if it is completed on time and budget. But that is splitting hairs. Project success or failure is not a matter of semantics. a project is a success only if it delivers the product or service on time, on budget, to the customer’s prescribed requirements, and if its financial returns, positive or negative, are consistent with the company’s strategic plan. Generally, projects succeed or fail according to how robust and viable the project management process is at the performing organization.

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