The Continental League: A Personal History

The Continental League: A Personal History

The Continental League: A Personal History

The Continental League: A Personal History

Synopsis

Long before there was Moneyball, a group of investors led by baseball legend Branch Rickey proposed a new economic model for baseball. Based on an innovative approach to evaluating and developing talent, the Continental League was the last serious attempt to form a third Major League. The league's brief history affords a glimpse of any number of missed chances for America's game.
As one of the original Continental Leaguers, historian Russell D. Buhite is--literally--talking "inside baseball" when he describes what happened in 1959 and 1960. Part memoir, part history, his account of the origin, development, and eventual undoing of the Continental League explores the organization's collective corporate structure as well as its significant role in building a thriving Minor League and forcing expansion on Major League Baseball. Buhite captures a lost era in baseball history and examines its lasting impact on the game.

Excerpt

Events of 1959 and 1960, though memorable, do not lead to easy characterization of the era. in 1959 Alaska and Hawaii, in that order, became the forty-ninth and fiftieth states of the Union. Governor Earl Long of Louisiana was diagnosed with a psychiatric illness and committed to the state mental hospital. He promptly fired the hospital director and replaced him with a political crony, who quickly declared him perfectly sane and released him. Elizabeth Taylor took her fourth husband, stealing Eddie Fisher away from Debbie Reynolds. That was no contest. Buddy Holly released his last record, “It Doesn’t Matter,” and Bob Dylan graduated from high school in Hibbing, Minnesota. Fidel Castro came to power in Cuba after overthrowing the government of Fulgencio Batista. Then in the spring he made a goodwill tour of the United States, before eventually turning to the Soviet Union for primary sustenance. in September Nikita Khrushchev made a thirteen-day trip to the United States, where he visited a hog farm in Iowa and tried, without success, to enter Disneyland.

In 1960 the Playboy Club opened in Chicago, but domestically presidential politics dominated the year. Senator John F. Kennedy received the Democratic nomination for . . .

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