The Golden Age of Indiana High School Basketball

The Golden Age of Indiana High School Basketball

The Golden Age of Indiana High School Basketball

The Golden Age of Indiana High School Basketball

Synopsis

The years 1945-1959 marked the time when basketball truly became the sport of Indiana. High school basketball bound together communities across the state and interest in the sport rose to a new level. The period saw the Milan/Muncie Central game, given new fame through the movie Hoosiers. It also saw the first televised game, the start of the career of Oscar Robertson (who played for Crispus Attucks), and friendly town rivalries to build the state's biggest gymnasium. It was a time before the massive consolidations of the 1960s and '70s, with more than 700 teams involved in basketball tournaments. (There are some 300 now.)

Greg Guffey captures the flavor of the period and showcases many of the best teams, players, and coaches. This is a book for all fans of Indiana basketball.

Excerpt

The road to John Little’s house in deep southern Indiana winds over hills, through fields, and past the Ohio River. His address is listed as Elizabeth— a dozen miles or so south of the state’s first capital city of Corydon—but the real location is a long way from nowhere. He built the house himself and designed the entire lower level as a shrine to his beloved Indiana University basketball and football teams. Jerseys, photos, autographed balls, and programs line the walls and the showcases, reminders of great players and even greater teams. It goes without saying that the basketball memorabilia occupies much more space than the football items. On this warm fall day, a dreadful Indiana football team occupies the big-screen television against an equally dreadful Penn State squad. But the story of this day is basketball, as Little has arranged for more than twenty former high school basketball players to spend an afternoon reminiscing about glory days. The ballplayers, as Little calls them, are set to arrive at staggered times throughout the day. Most arrive early and stay long past their allotted interview time, while Little makes sure to add their autographs to his growing collection. To make one thing clear: these are not former champions talking about the trips to Butler Fieldhouse. Most of those in attendance never won a sectional tournament; many of those in attendance lost more games in their careers than they won. They come from places such as Mauckport, Lanesville, New Salisbury, Marengo, Laconia, and English, schools not among those mentioned when the talk turns to the . . .
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