International Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice

International Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice

International Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice

International Perspectives on Consumers' Access to Justice

Synopsis

Consumer protection law in the age of globalisation poses new challenges for policy-makers. This book highlights the difficulties of framing regulatory responses to the problem of consumers' access to justice in the new international economy. The growth of international consumer transactions in the wake of technological change and the globalisation of markets suggests that governments can no longer develop consumer protection law in isolation from the international legal arena. Leading scholars consider the broader theme of access to justice from socio-legal, law and economics perspectives. Topics include standard form contracts, the legal challenges posed by mass infections (such as mad-cow disease and CJD), ombudsman schemes, class actions, alternative dispute resolution, consumer bankruptcy, conflict of laws, and cross-border transactions. This book demonstrates that advancing and achieving access to justice for consumers proves to be a challenging, and sometimes elusive, task.

Excerpt

The Eighth International Consumer Law Conference was held in Auckland, New Zealand, from 9–11 April 2001. John Skinnon of the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand was instrumental in ensuring that the Conference came to New Zealand on behalf of the International Association for Consumer Law, where it was jointly hosted by the Open Polytechnic and the Research Centre for Business Law at the University of Auckland. It was in large part made possible because of the generous sponsorship of the New Zealand Ministry of Consumer Affairs, the Emily Carpenter Consumer Charitable Trust, Butterworths (NZ), cch (NZ) and the Open Polytechnic. Over 120 delegates attended from numerous countries, including Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Britain, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Macau, Malta, New Zealand, Portugal, Singapore, South Africa, Sweden, Turkey and the United States.

The theme was ‘Consumers’ Access to Justice’. the essays collected in this volume were chosen from among the sixty papers presented. We thank the authors for their willingness to have their contributions included, and for the enormous patience they have shown during a lengthy editing and pre-publication period. We hope the quality of the final product convinces them that the wait was worthwhile!

Words of appreciation only inadequately compensate other people who worked with us on this project. First, Thierry Bourgoignie, President of the International Association for Consumer Law, was most gracious in all his contacts with those who organised and hosted the Conference, and was very helpful throughout. Secondly, in the staging of the Conference itself, the contributions of John Skinnon, John McDermott, Ross Grantham, Jane Needham and Bruna Correa were both vital and enormous. Thirdly, Jane Stapleton, John Skinnon, Paul Myburgh and John McDermott aided us in the process of refereeing the papers and determining which would be included in the book. in fact, more papers were initially chosen than could ultimately be accommodated in the book. Those additional papers were published in two issues of the New Zealand Business Law Quarterly in August and September 2002. Fourthly, Barnaby Stewart worked tirelessly on editing and reference checking, and Anne Russell proved to be a marvellous proofreader. Their work enabled a particularly clean and complete manuscript to be delivered to the publisher. Fifthly, we must acknowledge the financial contribution of the Research Centre for Business Law at the University of Auckland to the expenses incurred . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.