The Art of Connecting: How to Overcome Differences, Build Rapport, and Communicate Effectively with Anyone

The Art of Connecting: How to Overcome Differences, Build Rapport, and Communicate Effectively with Anyone

The Art of Connecting: How to Overcome Differences, Build Rapport, and Communicate Effectively with Anyone

The Art of Connecting: How to Overcome Differences, Build Rapport, and Communicate Effectively with Anyone

Synopsis

In an increasingly diverse workplace, it's more important and challenging than ever to communicate well. We must build bridges that cross our differences to connect our similarities. The Art of Connecting reveals five core principles and presents corresponding, specific strategies for overcoming communications barriers and connecting effectively with anyone, regardless of professional, generational, ethnic, cultural, or other differences. The authors also explain how the most skillful connectors are able to shift perspectives - to see a situation from three points of view: me,' "you,' and "them.' All of the principles and strategies are brought to life through absorbing examples and scenarios, plus engaging descriptions of "masters of connection' - like famed National Public Radio interviewer Terry Gross - doing what they do. There is alwaysa bridge. The Art of Connecting shows how to find it - every time. "

Excerpt

Harold Brown is a fifty-five-year-old African American. On Tuesday, he will make a sales presentation to a team of it guys at a hot new business. They’re all white and young enough to be his sons. If they buy, he’ll make his sales goal for the year. He knows there’s more to sales than a good product and presentation, and he worries about how well he will connect with them. What they do in their free time, what music they listen to, or even how they make decisions are mysteries to him. He knows they survived the it downturn—and survived it well—and that they have a reputation for a maverick approach, but he doesn’t know exactly what that means. “How can I convince them I’m competent?” he asks himself. “Will they think I’m a dinosaur?”

David Smith, forty-eight, just bought his second bagel franchise. When he bought the first store fifteen years ago, all his employees were white, middle-class suburban kids. the staff he inherited at the second store looks entirely different. Two were born in Sudan; one is a lesbian Gen Xer with a nose ring; another is a sixty-five-year-old grandmother; and three are Latino. He doesn’t know how to relate. They intimidate him. He’s not even sure where Sudan is. and is it Sudan or the Sudan? Will it offend them if he says it wrong?

Ellen Russell is a thirty-two-year-old journalist who works for a Christian magazine. Later today, she will interview a well-

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