The Employer's Legal Advisor: Handling Problem Employees Effectively, Knowing When and How to Work with an Attorney, Staying out of Court-- or Winning Your Case If You Get There

The Employer's Legal Advisor: Handling Problem Employees Effectively, Knowing When and How to Work with an Attorney, Staying out of Court-- or Winning Your Case If You Get There

The Employer's Legal Advisor: Handling Problem Employees Effectively, Knowing When and How to Work with an Attorney, Staying out of Court-- or Winning Your Case If You Get There

The Employer's Legal Advisor: Handling Problem Employees Effectively, Knowing When and How to Work with an Attorney, Staying out of Court-- or Winning Your Case If You Get There

Synopsis

It has become the bane of every employer's existence: the dreaded lawsuit from a disgruntled employee. Accusations of discrimination, sexual harassment, and unlawful firing are just a few of the charges that can make managers and HR professionals feel powerless and overwhelmed. The Employer's Legal Advisor will help employers deal with such challenging situations - and stop the wasted time, major expense, and lowmorale a legal action will cause. Renowned attorney Thomas Hanna has more than 40 years of experience representing high-profile businesses and winning hundreds of cases. Now he reveals practical advice for reducing the possibility of a lawsuit and for winning a case if it does go to court. Readers will discover how to: • Investigate problems and learn why they happen. • Handle problem employees effectively. • Keep thorough documentation during a disciplinary action. • Know when and how to work with an attorney. • Avoid illegal use of e-mail, video monitoring, and other devices to snoop" on employees. • Be an effective witness if a case comes to trial. "

Excerpt

In the years following the discovery of the New World, many European nations and eventually the United States issued “letters of marque” to private citizens. a letter of marque authorized a ship’s owner to arm his vessel and prey upon the commerce of a warring nation, keeping whatever booty he “liberated” at cannon point for his own profit (minus a share for his government, of course). These vessels and their crews were known as privateers or corsairs, and without a letter of marque, the commander and crew of such a ship would have been nothing less than pirates. Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution authorizes Congress to grant “letters of marque and reprisal.” in fact, Congress did issue such letters against the Barbary Pirates in 1800 and during the War of 1812.

The contemporary version of privateers is much more sophisticated. They are known today as “private attorney generals” and are authorized by law to collect a fee from alleged violators of specific laws, especially employment discrimination laws. the federal government, as well as many state governments, has enabled private citizens to sue for alleged violations of civil and employment rights and to . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.