Collaboration in Education

Collaboration in Education

Collaboration in Education

Collaboration in Education

Synopsis

Collaboration in Education establishes a needed framework for school/university collaborations that will be critical for others wishing to reproduce and participate in these partnerships. The contributors explore the elements necessary for sustainable collaboration in order to provide a frame of reference for others doing this work. This volume will help readers to ask the correct questions in thinking through school/university collaboration, such as: Does this collaboration make a true change in the way each parent organization operates in the future? Does it meet the needs of a more complex and changing work environment for universities and schools? Does it impact beyond the participant institutions and inform the field by producing knowledge of use to others? This volume also includes extensive analyses of ongoing school/university projects in the United States, Asia and Europe.

Excerpt

This essay focuses on two longitudinal school–college/university partnerships I have initiated and directed. the first one was at Queens College of the City University of New York (CUNY), and operated for 18 years under the title of Project scope I (1980–1998). the project targeted the school’s curriculum and the college’s preservice and inservice teacher education programs, and then integrated them to effect change and improvement in K–18 education. the belief that fundamental change in education occurs through a holistic–organic approach to partnerships was an integral part of Project SCOPE’s conceptual framework and theory. Aspects of that partnership were institutionalized and still exist today at Queens College.

In the latter part of 1998, Project SCOPE’s holistic approach to education change was expanded and relocated at Dowling College and three school districts on Long Island. the project went under the title of Project scope II—School–College Operation in Partnership Education. It included the core subject areas of an elementary-school curriculum, such as science and language arts. Project scope ii has been in existence since 1998 and continues to have a vibrant relationship with one of the original three school districts—the North Babylon School District (NBSD). in 2006, the Belmont Elementary School of the nbsd became a Professional Development School (PDS). It adheres to the essentials and standards for PDSs, as well as the basic tenets of a holistic–organic partnership. Both Project scope I and ii are categorized as PDS-type partnerships in that their goals are to improve pre-K–12 education, professional education (16–20), and student learning in a coordinative fashion. Grade levels 16 through 20 refer to master’s and doctoral degree programs in education.

In this essay, I analyze and compare the two partnerships with reference to the major elements of the Slater’s School/University Collaborative Matrix. Also, I comment on the type of relationship (symbiotic or organic) among the participants, the sources of power and influence, and how such factors impacted the partnerships. Finally, writing this essay has given me the opportunity to look back and reflect on my many years of partnership work. It has helped me to identify the important lessons that I have learned in directing these partnerships. the essay is written in my voice and from . . .

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