Systematic Theology - Vol. 2

Systematic Theology - Vol. 2

Systematic Theology - Vol. 2

Systematic Theology - Vol. 2

Synopsis

Widely regarded as the foremost theologian in the world today, Wolfhart Pannenberg here unfolds his long-awaited systematic theology, for which his many previous (primarily methodological) writings have laid the groundwork.

Volume 2 of Pannenberg's magnum opus moves beyond the highly touted discussion of systematic prolegomena and theology proper in Volume 1 to commanding, comprehensive statements concerning creation, the nature of man, Christology, and salvation. Throughout, Pannenberg brings to bear the vast command of historical and exegetical knowledge and philosophical argumentation for which he is well known.

Excerpt

The first volume of this systematic presentation of Christian doctrine pursued the question of the truth of talk about God into the field of the religions which with their different and in many ways contradictory truth claims compete with one another in both historical controversies and present-day religious pluralism. Christianity, despite and even with its summoning to a unique divine revelation, is one of these religions that contend with one another for ultimate truth about the world, humanity, and God.

The fact of these conflicts among religions is obvious enough in the life of people of very different cultures. Only a so-called theology of religions in the industrial societies of the West closes its eyes to this truth, depicting the many religions as in principle unconflicting ways to the same God. in the event this type of theology plays into the hands of the prejudice that the advanced secularism of the modern public has against all religious truth claims, treating the differences in religious confession merely as private matters of no public interest. This view evades the reality. Even today it is still being confirmed again and again that the deepest cultural differences have religious roots. Modern secularism, which would like to suppress this fact, is itself a by-product of the cultural tradition so strongly shaped by Christianity. Secularism, then, provides no basis on which to convince the religious traditions of other cultures that their truth claims are irrelevant. Christianity, too, has to cling to the truth claim of the revelation on which it rests. To make this claim with any credibility, we must first consider the many other claims and the related contestability of truth. in so doing we do not relativize the claim to the truth, even the . . .

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