The Second Letter to the Corinthians

The Second Letter to the Corinthians

The Second Letter to the Corinthians

The Second Letter to the Corinthians

Synopsis

Newest volume in the acclaimed Pillar New Testament Commentary series

The question that Paul set before the ancient church in Corinth -- Do you not recognize that Jesus Christ is in and among you? (2 Cor 13:5) -- remains a critical question for the church today. This commentary by Mark Seifrid seeks to hear Paul's message afresh and communicate it to our time.

Seifrid offers a unified reading of 2 Corinthians, which has often been regarded as a composite of excerpts and fragments. He argues that Paul's message is directed at the "practical atheism" of the Corinthian church -- the hidden heresy that assumes God's saving work in the world may be measured by outward standards of success and achievement.

Like all of the Pillar volumes, Seifrid's commentary on 2 Corinthians offers careful grammatical analysis and exegesis with clear pastoral application.

Excerpt

Commentaries have specific aims, and this series is no exception. Designed for serious pastors and teachers of the Bible, the Pillar commentaries seek above all to make clear the text of Scripture as we have it. the scholars writing these volumes interact with the most important informed contemporary debate, but avoid getting mired in undue technical detail. Their ideal is a blend of rigorous exegesis and exposition, with an eye alert both to biblical theology and to the contemporary relevance of the Bible, without confusing the commentary and the sermon.

The rationale for this approach is that the vision of “objective scholarship” (a vain chimera) may actually be profane. God stands over against us; we do not stand in judgment of him. When God speaks to us through his Word, those who profess to know him must respond in an appropriate way, and that is certainly different from a stance in which the scholar projects an image of autonomous distance. Yet this is no surreptitious appeal for uncontrolled subjectivity. the writers of this series aim for an even-handed openness to the text that is the best kind of “objectivity” of all.

If the text is God’s Word, it is appropriate that we respond with reverence, a certain fear, a holy joy, a questing obedience. These values should be reflected in the way Christians write. With these values in place, the Pillar commentaries will be warmly welcomed not only by pastors, teachers, and students, but by general readers as well.

In the world of New Testament scholarship, Mark Seifrid is best known for his careful and fulsome treatments of Paul’s doctrine of justification, on which he has made himself a remarkably competent expert. Here he turns to what is arguably Paul’s most emotionally wrenching epistle, a letter that soars to a kind of pastoral ecstasy and plunges to pastoral despair, a letter with some of the most difficult Greek in the New Testament and some of the most memo-

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