The ABC of Atoms

The ABC of Atoms

The ABC of Atoms

The ABC of Atoms

Excerpt

To the eye or to the touch, ordinary matter appears to be continuous ; our dinner-table, or the chairs on which we sit, seem to present an unbroken surface. We think that if there were too many holes the chairs would not be safe to sit on. Science, however, compels us to accept a quite different conception of what we are pleased to call “solid” matter ; it is. in fact, something much more like the Irishman’s definition of a net, “a number of holes tied together with pieces of string.” Only it would be necessary to imagine the strings cut away until only the knots were left.

When science seeks to find the units of which matter is composed, it is led to continually smaller particles. the largest unit is the molecule, but a molecule is as a rule composed of “atoms” of several different “elements.” For example, a molecule of water consists of two atoms of hydrogen and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.