Cyberimperialism? Global Relations in the New Electronic Frontier

Cyberimperialism? Global Relations in the New Electronic Frontier

Cyberimperialism? Global Relations in the New Electronic Frontier

Cyberimperialism? Global Relations in the New Electronic Frontier

Synopsis

This collection of essays addresses whether all nations will actively participate in building the information superhighway or whether the Internet will reflect global technological inequalities. The writings are grouped in four major sections, which examine theoretical issues on cyberglobalization, politics in the electronic global village, global economic issues in cyberspace, and national identities and grassroots movements in cyberspace. Contributing scholars represent a wide spectrum of disciplines from political science, economics, and communications to sociology, anthropology, and philosophy. A number of methodological and theoretical perspectives direct the writings. Collectively, the essays point toward an emerging technology that exhibits innate qualities characteristic of the classic notion of cultural imperialism.

This edited collection, with its timely approach to the implications of the Internet for global relations, will appeal to communication, sociology, and political science scholars. The interdisciplinary approach will also attract students and educators from such fields as anthropology, philosophy and economics. To aid in further research, select bibliographies follow each essay.

Excerpt

Is the Internet a messiah or a demon? What contributions will the technology make to the human condition? the Internet remains a mystery even as it continues to dramatically redefine the nature of social relationships between nations and within nations. the technology has already introduced complex dynamics between political institutions, commercial enterprises, nongovernmental agencies, and national interests. the ability of the Internet to bypass the gaze of official structures is redefining global politics. Geographical enclaves once separated by distance and time are developing new virtual relationships that are uninhibited by conventional notions of political territory and national sovereignty. the implications of these new types of cross-national contacts for the traditional notion of the nation-state as a mutually recognized sovereign entity preserved by identifiable geographic boundaries are still not clear.

While the Internet is still immature and many vicissitudes surround the technology, some of its tendencies are becoming obvious. the technology is less accessible and much more expensive in the developing nations than in the industrialized world. Because of the initial cost of hardware and continual on-line charges, Internet services are beyond the reach of many people in the developing nations. Necessary infrastructure for the use of the technology, such as telephone lines and electricity, are either nonexistent or obsolete in those parts of the world. in fact, 80 percent of the world’s population still lacks the most basic telecommunications provision, such as telephone lines.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.