Economic Conditions and Electoral Outcomes: The United States and Western Europe

Economic Conditions and Electoral Outcomes: The United States and Western Europe

Economic Conditions and Electoral Outcomes: The United States and Western Europe

Economic Conditions and Electoral Outcomes: The United States and Western Europe

Synopsis

Does economics influence elections? How does such influence work? Under what conditions is it more or less likely to occur? Free, popular elections matter, and they make a difference precisely because, at periodic intervals, they set the limits or constraints within which the interests of business and the interests of the people pursue their political goals. These are the basic ideas addressed in the chapters of this volume.

Excerpt

The papers in this volume were originally presented at the Shambaugh Conference on Economic Conditions and Electoral Outcomes, sponsored by the Department of Political Science of the University of Iowa and held there in March, 1984. Michael S. Lewis-Beck was the principal organizer of the conference, and Heinz Eulau served as the editor of the papers in Political Behavior, a journal published by Agathon Press, where they subsequently appeared. the conference was made possible by funds placed at the disposal of the Iowa Department of Political Science in memory of Professor Benjamin F. Shambaugh, who was head of the department from 1900 to 1940, and who served as president of the American Political Science Association. in recognition of the value of the Shambaugh fund for furthering scholarly exchange, any royalties which may accrue from this volume will be donated to the fund.

The Shambaugh memorial fund has permitted the Department of Political Science at Iowa to sponsor a series of lectures and conferences. Shambaugh lectures have been given by such distinguished political scientists as Karl Deutsch, Charles S. Hyneman, Dayton D. McKean, Arnold Rogow, Sheldon Wolin, and Herman Finer. Since the adoption of the conference format, Shambaugh research conferences producing significant publications have been held on the following subjects: frontiers of judicial research (1967), comparative legislative behavior research (1969), legislatures in developing countries (1971), teaching political science (1974), the role of European parliaments in managing social conflict (1977), mathematics in political science instruction (1977), the biological bases of political behavior (1980), the place of political theory in political science (1981), rural development in less-developed countries (1981), political science at the University of Iowa (1982), and, most recently, the impact of economic conditions on electoral outcomes (1984).

There is some risk in bringing together, in a single volume, a set of papers that more resembles a potpourri than a symphony; but the risk is not any greater than that involved in assembling a variety of scholars in a conference. As any veteran conference participant knows, no body of instructions to paper givers, no matter how well specified, is ever sufficient to orchestrate the multiplicity of voices that are heard, precisely because it is the purpose of a conference to allow each speaker to be heard on his or her own terms. in . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.