Whither the Early Republic: A Forum on the Future of the Field

Whither the Early Republic: A Forum on the Future of the Field

Whither the Early Republic: A Forum on the Future of the Field

Whither the Early Republic: A Forum on the Future of the Field

Synopsis

Penned by leading historians, the specially-commissioned essays of Whither the Early Republic represent the most stimulating and innovative work being done on imperialism, environmental history, slavery, economic history, politics, and culture in the early Republic.

The past fifteen years have seen a dramatic expansion in the scope of scholarship on the history of the early American republic. Whither the Early Republic consists of innovative essays on all aspects of the culture and society of this period, including Indians and empire, the economy and the environment, slavery and culture, and gender and urban life. Penned by leading historians, the essays are arranged thematically to reflect areas of change and growth in the field.

Throughout the book, preeminent scholars act as guides for students to their areas of expertise. Contributors include Pulitzer Prize-winner Alan Taylor, Bancroft Prize-winner James Brooks, Christopher Clark, Ted Steinberg, Walter Johnson, Patricia Cline Cohen, David Waldstreicher, and more. These essays, all originally commissioned to appear in a special issue of the Journal of the Early Republic, explore a diverse array of subjects: the struggles for control of North America; the economic culture of the early Republic; the interactions of humans with plants, climate, animals, and germs; the commodification of people; and the complex intersections of politics and culture.

Whither the Early Republic offers a wealth of tools for introducing a new generation of historians to the nature of the field and also to the wide array of possibilities that lie in the future for scholars of this fascinating period.

Excerpt

The Invitation

After fourteen and ten years respectively in the editorial chairs at the Journal of the Early Republic, the editors of this collection, Morrison and Larson, gave up the ghost and returned to the splendid insignificance of public university employment. Our years with the journal were marked (we like to think) by a successful enlargement of the scope and range of scholarship appearing in those pages concerning the history and culture of the early American republic. Like rodeo cowboys, we often feared that the mount had control of the rider, not the other way around; still, in all, we found it enormously rewarding, intellectually enriching, and personally very satisfying to try to stay conversant with the explosion of scholarly activities that have marked our field in the last decade or so. the extent to which we actually succeeded will be best known to readers of the journal, but our intentions were honorable and catholic, whatever limitations may have kept us from being truly open-minded.

John Lauritz Larson is Professor of History at Purdue University. For ten years
he was an editor at the Journal of the Early Republic. He is author of Internal
Improvement: National Public Works and the Promise of Popular Government in the
Early United States
(2001), and editor of a forthcoming special issue of the oah
Magazine of History on the market revolution in America. His current project is a
study of environmental factors and the rise of capitalism in the early United States.

Michael A. Morrison is Associate Professor of History at Purdue University.
For fourteen years he was an editor at the Journal of the Early Republic. He is
author of Slavery and the American West: the Eclipse of Manifest Destiny and the
Coming of the Civil War
(1999) and numerous collections of essays. He is cur
rently writing a book on the Mexican-American War and the transformation of
American political culture.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.