Henry Grey (c. 1500-1554): A History in Documents

Henry Grey (c. 1500-1554): A History in Documents

Henry Grey (c. 1500-1554): A History in Documents

Henry Grey (c. 1500-1554): A History in Documents

Synopsis

Historian James D. Taylor gathers in one volume all known historical information regarding Henry Grey, father of Lady Jane Grey. Descended from a distinguished and noble heritage that produced two queens, Henry Grey gave up a comfortable, quiet and leisurely life to become one of the most powerful and influential men in England next to the king. His influence was so strong that, working in alliance with the Duke of Northumberland, he was able to coerce the young King Edward VI, on his deathbed, to change the order of succession to place Lady Jane Grey on the throne when Edward died, making Henry Grey the father of the Queen.

Excerpt

My intent for this book is not to place Henry Grey in a positive or negative light; instead, it is to provide essentially all the known historical information regarding the man.

Henry Grey, 3rd Marquis of Dorset, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, descended from a distinguished and noble heritage that produced two queens. He gave up a comfortable, quiet and leisurely life to become one of the most powerful and influential men in England. His influence was so strong that, working in alliance with the Duke of Northumberland, he was able to coerce the young and dying King Edward vi to change the order of succession to the crown, making his daughter, Lady Jane Grey, next in line for the throne, so that Henry Grey became father of the queen of England.

The task of pulling together all reliable information on a subject is not as simple as it might sound. We are living in the information age, yet with all our quick and easy access to a multitude of information, too much is incorrectly recorded and repeated. Many people do not take the time to review the original source information to determine whether it is accurate. Often people will rely solely on one source and believe the information presented “must be correct, because a source says it is,” as a student once told me. This includes websites like Wikipedia. Full of information as it is, Wikipedia sometimes makes information available that is not correct. Often their sources are not cited, and this can be a sign of trouble.

Allow me to share with you an example from personal experience. While conducting research on a person who lived during Renaissance England, I clicked on a link that redirected me to a child pornography website. If that can happen, imagine what lesser misdeeds and “misdirection” one might stumble upon. I

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