Managing the Brief for Better Design

Managing the Brief for Better Design

Managing the Brief for Better Design

Managing the Brief for Better Design

Synopsis

Briefing is not just presenting a set of documents to the design team; it is a process of developing a deep understanding about client needs. This book provides both inspiration to clients and a framework for practitioners. The coverage extends beyond new build, covering briefing for services and fit-outs. Written by an experienced and well-known team of authors, this new edition clearly explains how important the briefing process is to both the construction industry, in delivering well-designed buildings, and to their clients in achieving them. The text is illustrated by excellent examples of effective practice, drawn from DEGW experience, as well as five model briefs and invaluable process charts.

Excerpt

There will no longer be any excuse for corporate and professional clients and their designers denying their interdependence in developing the brief and carrying out post-occupancy evaluation. Although this raises many questions about who is the client and who is (are) the designer(s); this fascinating book provides the theory, together with a range of practical models as to how to deliver best business practice in the first and last phases of the procurement process.

When Egan’s Rethinking Construction (1998) built on Latham’s excellent Constructing the Team (1994) and challenged the industry to improve its performance dramatically, he also identified the parts of the business cycle that are normally missing in construction – the testing of the brief and feedback after occupation. Egan drew on the theories of ‘lean thinking’ in demanding the measurement of performance against benchmarks in order to eliminate waste and improve performance. the extraordinary energy that the leading firms in the construction industry and their clients have put into innovation in the construction part of the cycle to their mutual benefit, has tended to obscure these areas of the greatest potential value – the brief and the feedback; and it is tragic that there is so little understanding in the body of the industry that they are both integral parts of the design process.

This book draws on the remarkable body of research and design of John Worthington, Frank Duffy and their colleagues over 25 years, most of which has focused on the demands of leading-edge, multinational corporate businesses. the lessons and the examples are clearly laid out for us all to use, in whatever sector, and develop for our own needs, with the help of many elegant diagrams . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.