You've Got 8 Seconds: Communication Secrets for a Distracted World

You've Got 8 Seconds: Communication Secrets for a Distracted World

You've Got 8 Seconds: Communication Secrets for a Distracted World

You've Got 8 Seconds: Communication Secrets for a Distracted World

Synopsis

You made a great point -- but did anybody hear it?

Every day at work, people do three things: talk, listen, and pretend to listen. That's not surprising--the average attention span has dropped to 8 seconds. To get heard, says high-stakes communications expert Paul Hellman, you need to focus your message, be slightly different, and deliver with finesse.

Through fast, fun, actionable tips, You've Got 8 Seconds explains what works and what doesn't, what's forgettable and what sticks. With stories, scripts, and examples of good and bad messages, the book reveals three main strategies:

FOCUS: Design a strong message--then say it in seconds.

VARIETY: Make routine information come alive.

PRESENCE: Convey confidence and command attention.

You'll discover practical techniques, including the Fast-Focus Method(tm) that the author uses with leadership teams; how to stand out in the first seconds of a presentation; and 10 actions that spell executive presence.

Whether pitching a project, giving a speech, selling a product, or just writing your next email, with You've Got 8 Seconds you'll get heard, get remembered, and get results.

Excerpt

“In Maine we have a saying that there’s no point in speaking
unless you can improve on silence.”

—EDMUND muskie,
former U.S. Senator and Secretary of State

Don’t Over-Salt

Detail is like salt. You can always add more. (If others want more, they’ll ask questions.) But once in, you can’t take it out.

Consider what your audience wants to know. But also, and every bit as important, what they don’t want to know—because they’ve got no time, no interest, they’re preoccupied with 10,000 other things, and they’d gladly pay you a boatload of money if you simply didn’t tell them.

“Describe yourself,” one ceo asks job applicants, “in three words or less.”

What would you say? Probably not “wordy and repetitive.”

But how focused are you?

“You seem to have 29 ideas at once,” an exec told one of his managers. “And I feel like I’m hearing them all, right this minute.”

Ever gotten feedback like that?

I work with several companies where executives, after taking a communication assessment, will gladly tell you their preferred styles. Each style has its own color.

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