Regions That Work: How Cities and Suburbs Can Grow Together

Regions That Work: How Cities and Suburbs Can Grow Together

Regions That Work: How Cities and Suburbs Can Grow Together

Regions That Work: How Cities and Suburbs Can Grow Together

Synopsis

A startling new reading of Martin Heidegger's early thought leading up to Being and Time (1927) and its subsequent development in his later writings.

Excerpt

In April 1992, the City of Los Angeles suffered three days of the worst civil disorder in American history. While the immediate cause was a verdict in the Rodney King case, many laid the blame on the economic wreckage left by both persistent poverty and a decade of regional restructuring. Subsequent analysis gave credence to this view: in the areas of Los Angeles that experienced property damage, poverty and unemployment rates were twice as high, and home ownership and per capita income only half as high, as in the rest of the city.

Many observers hoped that the Los Angeles unrest would catalyze a major national commitment to revitalize American cities—an urban Marshall Plan. the timing seemed perfect: the riots occurred in the midst of a national election for president and Congress, and with the Berlin Wall felled and the Soviet Union in collapse, a “peace dividend” to address long unmet domestic needs was possible. Newly elected president Bill Clinton proposed a $19.5 billion “stimulus package” based on a list of projects presented to the administration by the U.S. Conference of Mayors, and Henry Cisneros, a dynamic former mayor of San Antonio, took over as secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

Yet the plight of the cities quickly fell off the agenda as Congress rejected the spending package and slashed the budget for hud. Such a slippage of policy attention was in keeping with America’s attitude toward its urban areas: no other major industrial nation has allowed its cities to face the type of fiscal and social troubles confronting large U.S. municipalities. While violent crime rates in urban areas have declined in recent years, other indicators of social stress have remained unconscionably high. Moreover, the problems of cities, such as chronic fiscal problems and deepening . . .

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