Rock Climbing: The Ultimate Guide

Rock Climbing: The Ultimate Guide

Rock Climbing: The Ultimate Guide

Rock Climbing: The Ultimate Guide

Synopsis

This book provides the ultimate guide to rock climbing in the United States, suitable for climbers and nonclimbers alike, covering the technical and physical aspects of the sport as well as the mental challenges involved.

• A chronological history of rock climbing in the United States, covering the places, events, and people

• A glossary of key climbing terms

• A subject index

Excerpt

in the winter of 1994, late at night, I found myself standing with the British climber Colin Gibberd on the main street of North Conway, New Hampshire. At the time, I was also pregnant with our son, Eddie Joe Robinson. We had not arranged any accommodation beforehand but had ventured here “on spec” from England via New York, on a Greyhound bus, to ice climb at Cathedral Ledge and Mount Washington. We went into a nearby garage and began talking to a local man who was staying at a ski lodge in the town. When he realized I was pregnant, he offered us, as he put it, “a room at the inn.” We went ice climbing and stayed in the Harvard Cabin on Mount Washington. As I recall, I also made my first Betty Crocker cake on this trip as a thank you to those people who had shown us such kindness and hospitality. A man who was staying at the ski lodge informed us both that because of the extremely adverse weather conditions, “you will die” when we told him we were going ice climbing on Mount Washington. However, all three of us survived to tell the tale. I started climbing in the mid-1980s. This experience has included traditional climbing, sport climbing, and bouldering on rock and ice in England, Scotland, and Wales; Europe, for example, France and Spain; and the United States, where I have climbed with both male partners and friends of both sexes. After the birth of my son, and with my career as a sociologist in British universities taking off, my climbing activities ceased and I referred to myself as a “lapsed” climber. I contented myself with merely writing about the sport of rock climbing rather than practicing it. However, in 2011, I found myself sport climbing in Thailand, at Krabi, where I again realized just why climbing is such an exhilarating, pleasurable, and life-affirming sport. I do not know if or how seriously I will take up rock climbing again. Yet one thing is for certain: there is no such thing as a “lapsed climber,” only one who needs sufficient sun, sand, and endless limestone crags to discover a renewed enthusiasm for the sport.
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.