Trans-Appalachian Frontier: People, Societies, and Institutions, 1775-1850

Trans-Appalachian Frontier: People, Societies, and Institutions, 1775-1850

Trans-Appalachian Frontier: People, Societies, and Institutions, 1775-1850

Trans-Appalachian Frontier: People, Societies, and Institutions, 1775-1850

Synopsis

A thorough revision of a classic book about America's first frontier

Excerpt

This is a book about the first American frontier of the transAppalachian West. More specifically, it is about the varied experiences of people, the emergence of societies, and the development of institutions on the trans-Appalachian frontier from 1775 to 1850.

People are at the center of this story. From the middle of the eighteenth century, ambitious and adventurous Anglo-American men and women in growing numbers penetrated into the region west of the Appalachian Mountains. It was a fertile land, well watered, and a hunter’s paradise; above all, it was remote. the obstacles to movement and settlement were great distances, physical barriers in the form of mountains, forests, and rivers, and human obstacles in the form of the hostility of Indian peoples of the Ohio Valley. International rivalries had long also influenced the settlement of European peoples in the transAppalachian region. For almost a century, the English and French had fought for control of the interior of the continent, especially the great river systems of the Ohio and the Mississippi. in 1756 another war broke out between the two imperial rivals. It was the fourth and, as it turned out, the decisive conflict. the English were everywhere triumphant, and at the Treaty of Paris . . .

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