The Elements of Résumé Style: Essential Rules for Writing Résumés and Cover Letters That Work

The Elements of Résumé Style: Essential Rules for Writing Résumés and Cover Letters That Work

The Elements of Résumé Style: Essential Rules for Writing Résumés and Cover Letters That Work

The Elements of Résumé Style: Essential Rules for Writing Résumés and Cover Letters That Work

Synopsis

It's amazing the misinformation found in most resume books! Scott Bennett has hired hundreds of people in a variety of industries, and he knows firsthand what kind of resume sparks an employer's interest--and which ones fail. In The Elements of resume Style, he warns against popular "tricks" that tend to backfire--and instead shows readers how to craft clear, compelling, targeted resumes and cover letters that actually work.

In this new edition, readers see that whether it's on paper or online, the rules are the same: use clear, dynamic language--and keep it short and focused. Now covering social media, the online application process, and more, this indispensable guide provides:

More than 1,400 action words, statements, and position descriptions that help sell your skills and experience • Hundreds of words, phrases, and vague claims to avoid • Advice for handling employment gaps, job-hopping, and requests for salary history and requirements • Sample resumes, response letter, inquiry letter, informational interview request letter, references, and more • Surprising tips for acing the interview

Competition is intense no matter what your field, but this candid book's time-tested tools will make you stand out--and help get you the job you deserve!

Excerpt

Paraphrasing oft-amended remarks by American author and humorist Mark Twain: Reports of the résumé’s death are wildly exaggerated. More than a few present-day career writers have claimed 1) the résumé is your obituary, and 2) social media presence is who you are. Both of these claims are absurd, and here’s why.

Yes, a poorly crafted résumé can resemble an obituary, and yet this was equally true way before social media, before the Internet, before personal computing, before the typewriter, and even before typesetting.

Social media—as prolific and sometimes ingenious as it is—follows venerable traditions like oral storytelling, calligraphy, handwriting, and the printing press; the typewriter, mini-computing, the word processor, pc, notebook/laptop, and tablet or smart phone; hand delivery, Pony Express, usps (“snail mail”), fax (telecopy, facsimile), and FedEx; e-mail, e-mail attachments, word processing software (.doc, .docx), Adobe Reader (.pdf), html, text messages, photo formats, video formats, audio formats, qr codes, the cloud, and so much more. the foregoing comprises a teeny-tiny subset of the impressive and unending array of delivery systems past, present, and future. Take care to not confuse content with delivery system. Similarly, the phrase “war on terror” sounds a lot like “war on cannons” or “war on water balloons”—terror and cannons and water balloons are delivery systems, not enemies. Focus on your content at least as much as the delivery system(s), because content is what sells.

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