The Healthy Workplace: How to Improve the Well-Being of Your Employees--and Boost Your Company's Bottom Line

The Healthy Workplace: How to Improve the Well-Being of Your Employees--and Boost Your Company's Bottom Line

The Healthy Workplace: How to Improve the Well-Being of Your Employees--and Boost Your Company's Bottom Line

The Healthy Workplace: How to Improve the Well-Being of Your Employees--and Boost Your Company's Bottom Line

Synopsis

When employees thrive, the company thrives.

Is your workplace working for you and your employees? Studies show that unhealthy work habits, like staring at computer screens and rushing through fast-food lunches are taking their toll in the form of increased absenteeism, lost productivity, and higher insurance costs--but it doesn't have to be that way.

Companies such as Google, Apple, Aetna, and Johnson & Johnson have used innovative techniques to incorporate healthy habits and practices into the workday and into their culture--with impressive ROI. Packed with real-life examples and the latest research, The Healthy Workplace proves that it pays to invest in your people's well-being and reveals how to:

Create a healthier, more energizing environment • Reduce stress to enhance concentration • Inspire movement at work • Use choice architecture to encourage beneficial behaviors • Support better sleep • Heighten productivity without adding hours to the workday

Filled with tips for immediate improvement and guidelines for building a long-term plan, The Healthy Workplace will boost both employee well-being and the bottom line.

Excerpt

“I realize it has become too easy to find a diet to fit in with
whatever you happen to feel like eating and that diets are
not there to be picked and mixed but picked and stuck to,
which is exactly what I shall begin to do once I’ve eaten this
chocolate croissant.”

—Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones’s Diary

“DOES this chair make my butt look fat?” After laughing, my husband, John, got a worried look and stopped in his tracks. “Uh, are you serious?” he asked. I realized, of course, that no man in his right mind would dare answer this question, but I really wanted to know. “I’m not saying you need to answer me, but honestly, I spend all day at work sitting at my desk and staring at a computer. I feel like I’ve been working this way for ages and that it’s finally catching up with me. Do you think being chained to a chair has something to do with my midsection spread?” John agreed—very carefully —that yes, he felt that his job, similarly involving staring at a computer for many hours, was not exactly benefiting his health, and slow weight gain and stress were bothering him, too. Up until recently, we had both regularly complained that we did not get enough time to work out and we continually felt frustrated and guilty about it. At least in my case, I was surprised—almost shocked—by how my health was deteriorating. I mean, I thought I was doing everything right. But the truth was that I had been neglecting my . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.