Children's Home Musical Experiences across the World

Children's Home Musical Experiences across the World

Children's Home Musical Experiences across the World

Children's Home Musical Experiences across the World

Synopsis

This book offers a fresh and diverse perspective on home musical activities of young children from a variety of countries, including; Brazil, Denmark, Greece, Israel, Kenya, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, South Africa,Taiwan, the UK, and the United States. Narrowing their study to seven-year-olds from middle-class families, the articles in this volume argue that home musical experiences provide new and important windows into musical childhoods as they relate to issues of identity, family life, gender, culture, social class and schooling. Though childhood musical engagement differs considerably, it has direct implications for a better understanding of music education and childhood development. Using a wiki to share data and research across time and space, this volume is a model for collaborative cross-cultural research and is centered on the home as a primary research site for children's musical engagement.

Excerpt

Framed predominantly by methods and theories from developmental psychology and usually with the school as a main locus, research on children’s music education has at times endorsed the view of music as a “thing” to be learned by specific social and cultural groups. Music education research has also embraced, for the most part, the logic that music learning and development occur in universal stages, moving in a somewhat linear fashion from simple to complex with adult abilities as the endpoint, and with little exploration of contextual issues. This is made evident by the large volume of controlled studies on the musical skills and behaviors of children and adults, which still dominates music education research to date. As important as they are, these works provide a partial view of music learning and development in childhood. in recent years, however, efforts have been made to understand how and why humans engage with music in everyday life and the ways in which these experiences relate to music teaching and learning. Seminal works in the social psychology of music (e.g., Clarke, Dibben, and Pitts, 2008; Hargreaves and North, 1998; North and Hargreaves, 2008), sociology of music and music education (DeNora, 2000; Small, 1998; Wright, 2010), ethnomusicology (e.g., Turino, 2006), and more recently, cultural psychology (Barrett, 2011), have been particularly important in this regard. Social psychologists and sociologists, for example, have called our attention to the fact that music is, above all, a social endeavour (Hargreaves and North, 1998; Small, 1998). Their works remind us that music learning is directly linked to human interactions and to the ways that diverse social groups view and differentiate humans based on age, sex and gender, race, religion, ethnicity, and so on (e.g., Green, 1997; O’Neill, 1997). Likewise, ethnomusicologists, anthropologists, and cultural psychologists have problematized how cultural beliefs, values, and practices shape human belief systems, cognition, and action (Barrett, 2011; Campbell, 2002; Turino, 2006), suggesting that music learning is intimately linked to the many cultures and subcultures that surround the individual. It is significant that these works . . .

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