Serenity: A Boxing Memoir

Serenity: A Boxing Memoir

Serenity: A Boxing Memoir

Serenity: A Boxing Memoir

Synopsis

"This is a surprising book, a terrific book. It's not about boxing, but about an odd, demanding world in which boxing is the thread, the key to existence. Wiley deftly broadens the delineation of this world and its people. Perceptive reporting is the foundation and perceptive reporting is rare enough. Wiley enhances it with clear, quick writing laced with humor and with a sensitivity that lends brilliance to this impressive work."-Robert W. Creamer, author of Baseball and Other Matters in 1941. "Ralph Wiley, with Serenity, has produced an original book about the ring.... He can dig beneath the surface and show us what really happened in a bout: why Thomas Hearns, with too much faith in his powerful right hand, lost to Sugar Ray Leonard in their first match.... Or why Roberto Duran was acting out of prudence, not cowardice, when he quit in his second fight against Leonard.... Yet the book is not really about boxing. Boxing in Serenity is what T. S. Eliot, speaking of plot, called the meat a burglar brings to distract the watchdog. The book is really about growing up in a world where you had to defend yourself physically to survive."-New York Times. "Wiley's rapport with boxers is profound."-Publisher's Weekly. "Wiley is one writer who really knows his way around a boxing ring.... He writes] with passion and understanding about complex, violent men and their oddly redemptive sport."-Booklist. Ralph Wiley is the author or coauthor of several works, most recently Born to Play: The Eric Davis Story.

Excerpt

I have always considered serenity to be an admirable state of existence. I have pursued serenity and found it elusive. So I have pursued the company of those I thought possessed it in greatest supply; they understand the futilities of worry and strife. the first person I met who had this serenity was my Uncle Charles, who was once a prizefighter. I was only a child, so with childish logic I assumed all prizefighters were serene.

I was right. in spite of their circumstances fighters indeed have serenity to a greater degree than ordinary people. Whether fighters gain their serenity because they face down life and death or because the sense to worry has been knocked clean out of their heads, I don’t know. They might lose many things by the time they stop fighting, but they remain serene. So, Serenity is a book about fighters—who they are, why they fight, and how it feels to be one.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.