Self-Directed Support: Personalisation, Choice and Control

Self-Directed Support: Personalisation, Choice and Control

Self-Directed Support: Personalisation, Choice and Control

Self-Directed Support: Personalisation, Choice and Control

Synopsis

Since the late 1990s, there has been a concerted policy drive across social care towards cash based modes of support and strategies to personalise services. Support for this shift was initiated by the disabled peoples' movement, both in the UK and globally. Policies introducing direct payments in lieu of provided services have been secured gradually as a central plank of the campaign for independent living.
Subsequently successive governments have promoted a shift towards personalisation as part of a wider focus to develop local care markets and to facilitate enhanced choice and control in service provision. In Scotland, this has been pursued through new legislation for self-directed support. As the new policy is introduced local authorities and providers face challenges in transforming social care. The authors examine some of the key themes and debates emerging from the implementation of this policy. These include a look at the new language that is emerging, as well as the changing roles for users, carers, local authorities and service providers flowing from the new policy environment. They focus on the impact of change for front-line workers and a reassess the progress of the broader personalisation agenda across the UK and in Europe during a time of widespread austerity and financial cuts.
Written for professional and post-graduate audiences Self-directed Support will stimulate those wrestling with these themes from policy and professional perspectives and provide essential analysis for those studying health and social policy.

Excerpt

Over the past thirty years, there has been a gradual shift in social care provision towards an increasingly personalised framework of support, whereby individual users are more involved in the choice of services they are assessed as needing. They can have the option of purchasing these through a cash payment, which is paid directly to them (Arksey and Kemp, 2008). With new legislation for selfdirected support (SDS) implemented in Scotland in April 2014, social care has entered a new era, heralding a major cultural shift for both users and service professionals. By drawing on a range of literature and empirical findings that have underpinned the emergence of policies in Scotland, the uk and across Europe, this book sets out to unravel some of the key debates. in doing this, it will set out the framework to explore the conceptual changes, the renegotiation of professional roles and the impact on users, particularly as legislation emerges at a time of economic downturn.

Before setting out these ideas in more detail, however, it is important to recognise the origins of policy development and establish the backdrop of disability activism, which initiated these changes. We therefore begin by outlining how a campaign by a small number of disabled people informed a long-term global shift in the reorganisation and delivery of social care services. Discussion then moves to explore how direct payments (DP) policy emerged on the statute and yet led to only marginal use across the uk, especially in Scotland. Despite acknowledging the importance of an increasingly individualised model of social care, the implementation of dp policy has waned in the past decade, and successive central and local governments north and south of the border - have embraced a new focus on ‘personalisation’. in looking at some of the broader themes through which . . .

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