Disease Surveillance: Technological Contributions to Global Health Security

Disease Surveillance: Technological Contributions to Global Health Security

Disease Surveillance: Technological Contributions to Global Health Security

Disease Surveillance: Technological Contributions to Global Health Security

Synopsis

In response to the call of the 48th World Health Assembly for a substantial revision of the International Health Regulations, this new edition of the Regulations will enter into force on June 15, 2007. The purpose and scope of the Regulations are "to prevent, protect against, control and provide a public health response to the international spread of disease in ways that are commensurate with and restricted to public health risks, and which avoid unnecessary interference with international traffic and trade." The Regulations also cover certificates applicable to international travel and transport, and requirements for international ports, airports and ground crossings.

Excerpt

Now, more than ever, public health authorities need fast and accurate information about new disease threats. People and their pathogens move quickly, as evidenced by the 2014 Ebola outbreak, the largest in recorded history. Fortunately, we have an array of new technologies, big data sources, and sophisticated analytic approaches. These can serve either to illuminate or to obfuscate disease surveillance data, depending on the appropriateness of the presentation and the understanding of the modern audience. Disease surveillance has changed a lot since Alex Langmuir defined it as “the continued watchfulness over the distribution and trends of incidence through the systematic collection, consolidation and evaluation of morbidity and mortality reports and other relevant data” in 1963, but it remains an essential cornerstone of public health practice. the dramatic changes over the past decade with big data sources and powerful new visualization tools promise to accelerate in the coming decades. in this new textbook, David Blazes and Sheri Lewis have brought together some of the leading thinkers and writers on global health security and disease surveillance.

Disease Surveillance: Technological Contributions to Global Health Security will be a valuable resource for a wide range of readers. New students of public health will benefit from the reviews of electronic disease surveillance and international health regulations policy (Chapters 1 and 2), and experienced health authorities will learn from the comprehensive update on data visualization techniques (Chapter 6) and the detailed review of legal considerations around open source software (Chapter 10). With the expansion of interest and funding for global health security and the rapid technological innovations in surveillance, this new text fills an essential niche.

Scott F. Dowell, md mph Deputy Director for Surveillance and Epidemiology Vaccine Development, Global Health Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Seattle, Washington

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