Child-Parent-Relationship (C-P-R) Therapy: A 10-Session Filial Therapy Model

Child-Parent-Relationship (C-P-R) Therapy: A 10-Session Filial Therapy Model

Child-Parent-Relationship (C-P-R) Therapy: A 10-Session Filial Therapy Model

Child-Parent-Relationship (C-P-R) Therapy: A 10-Session Filial Therapy Model

Synopsis

This book offers a survey of the historical and theoretical development of the filial therapy approach and presents an overview of filial therapy training and then filial therapy processes. The book also includes a transcript of an actual session, answers to common questions raised by parents, children, and therapists, as well as additional resources and research summaries. Additional chapters address filial therapy with special populations, filial therapy in special settings, and perhaps the most useful resource for busy therapists and parents, a chapter covers variations of the 10 session model, to allow for work with individual parents, training via telephone, and time-intensive or time-extended schedules.

Excerpt

This book is about changing the mental health structure of families, communities, and ultimately society, by changing the nature of relationships in families through a process of helping parents become therapeutic agents in their children’s lives. We now know that in a matter of a few weeks, parents are quite capable of learning and incorporating into their relationships with their children and spouses therapeutic skills once thought to require years of graduate education and training.

What we have written in this book about Child Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT): a 10-Session Filial Therapy Model is an extension of our experiences with children in play therapy as they expressed themselves through the process of play in the safety of a caring relationship that released their inner dynamic potential that had been previously unknown to significant adults in their lives. We have long held a deep and abiding belief in the ability of parents to establish the same kind of therapeutic relationship with their own children by learning and incorporating the basic attitudes and skills of child-centered play therapy in special play relationships, referred to as filial therapy.

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