Currents in Transatlantic History: Encounters, Commodities, Identities

Currents in Transatlantic History: Encounters, Commodities, Identities

Currents in Transatlantic History: Encounters, Commodities, Identities

Currents in Transatlantic History: Encounters, Commodities, Identities

Synopsis

Transatlantic historians are dedicated to analyzing the dynamic process of encounter, interchange, and creolization that was initiated when peoples on different sides of the Atlantic Basin first made contact and continues until the twenty-first century. The forty-ninth annual Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lecture Series —“Currents in Transatlantic Thought”—was organized to commemorate the fifteenth anniversary of the University of Texas at Arlington’s doctoral program in transatlantic history. Six alumni of the program were invited to return and present their ongoing research in this new approach to history that focuses on the complex process of interchange and adaptation that began when Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans first came into contact. The essays stemming from those lectures cover a variety of topics grouped around three unifying themes—encounters, commodities, and identities—that illustrate the potentiality of transatlantic history.

Excerpt

The forty-ninth annual Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures, “Currents in Transatlantic History: Encounters, Commodities, Identities,” were organized to commemorate the fifteenth anniversary of the creation of UTA’s doctoral program in Transatlantic History and to honor the contribution of Stanley H. Palmer, who was instrumental in its formation. Accordingly, we invited six of our graduates to return to Arlington on March 6, 2014, to present papers that dealt with various aspects of Transatlantic History, the field of study that focuses on the complex process of interchange and adaptation that began when Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans first came into contact, a process that continues today. the expanded versions of their presentations found herein are based on the authors’ current scholarly interests and focus on topics representative of the diverse research conducted under our Transatlantic History program during the past fifteen years.

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