Postcards from Rio: Favelas and the Contested Geographies of Citizenship

Postcards from Rio: Favelas and the Contested Geographies of Citizenship

Postcards from Rio: Favelas and the Contested Geographies of Citizenship

Postcards from Rio: Favelas and the Contested Geographies of Citizenship

Synopsis

Through the analysis of a variety of favela-based visual cultural productions by young people and contemporary theorists, Postcards from Rio examines the complex relationship between citizenship and urban space in contemporary Rio de Janeiro. By analyzing videos and photographs, Kátia da Costa Bezerra illustrates how citizens of favelas are reshaping their sense of belonging as subjects and as a legitimate part of the city. A groundbreaking study that examines more deeply the relationship between urban space, citizenship, and imagery originating in the favelas, Postcards from Rio sheds crucial light on how contemporary lenses are defining and mediating the meanings of space and citizenship as strategies of empowerment. The city emerges as a political space where multiplicities of perspectives are intertwined with demands for more inclusive forms of governance.

Excerpt

The stigma attached to living in a favela runs too deep to be obliterated by
appearances.

—Janice Perlman, Favela: Four Decades of Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro

There is no widely accepted definition of the term “favela.” in 2010, the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics defined favelas as irregular settlements in subnormal agglomerates. a subnormal agglomerate is described as an area with a minimum of fifteen household units, lacking essential infrastructure, services, and legal standards, occupying one third of a public or private property and arranged in a disorderly, dense way. the 2010 census identified around 6,329 subnormal agglomerates with 11,425,644 inhabitants, making up around 6 percent of the total Brazilian population. Data from the census shows that subnormal agglomerates are mostly located in large urban areas. Approximately 43.7 percent of subnormal agglomerates in Brazil are located in the metropolitan areas of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Belém. São Paulo, the capital, has 2,087 subnormal agglomerates with 2,715,067 inhabitants (11.42 percent of the city’s population). the state of Rio de Janeiro has 1,332 subnormal agglomerates with 2,023,744 inhabitants (out of the state’s total population of 15,936,268), while the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro has 1,393,314 residents living in subnormal agglomerates—constituting 68.85 percent of the state’s residents of subnormal agglomerates, and 22.16 percent of the city’s populationnearly twice that of São Paulo (Censo 2010). Some of these agglomerates . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.