Anti-Judaism, Antisemitism, and Delegitimizing Israel

Anti-Judaism, Antisemitism, and Delegitimizing Israel

Anti-Judaism, Antisemitism, and Delegitimizing Israel

Anti-Judaism, Antisemitism, and Delegitimizing Israel

Synopsis

Although early Zionist thinkers perhaps naively believed that anti-Jewish persecution would end with sovereignty, anti-Zionism has become one form of the "new" antisemitism following World War II. Because antisemitism has not been effectively addressed, anti-Jewish rhetoric, activism, and deadly violence have flourished around the world.
In Anti-Judaism, Antisemitism, and Delegitimizing Israel editor Robert S. Wistrich and an array of notable academics, journalists, and political scientists analyze multiple aspects of the current surge in anti-Jewish and anti-Israel rhetoric and violence. Contributors Ben Cohen, R. Amy Elman, Lesley Klaff, Matthias Kentzel, Nelly Las, Alvin H. Rosenfeld, and Efraim Sicher, among others, examine antisemitism from the perspectives of history, academia, gender, identity, and religion. Offering a variety of viewpoints and insights into disturbing trends worldwide, the contributors provide a basis for further discussion and increased efforts to counter the increasingly vocal and violent hatred of Jews and Israel.

Excerpt

The articles contained in this volume on Anti-Judaism, Antisemitism, and Delegitimizing Israel are representative of the discussions that were part of a conference held at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in May 2014. the current collection is not a presentation of the papers given, but rather are essays requested by Professor Robert Wistrich which illustrate many aspects of the current surge in anti-Jewish and anti-Israel rhetoric and violence. Contributors to this volume include academics, independent researchers, journalists, political scientists, and representatives of Jewish organizations. It should be noted that the views presented in these papers are those of the authors, and do not represent the Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Antisemitism, which is a non-political research institute.

Ben Cohen’s opening essay points to the hyperawareness of Jews worldwide to threats of antisemitic violence. Yet he points out that:

In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, when modern antisemitism
crystallized, the Jewish experience of it was defined by three factors:
first, the existence of discriminatory legislation; second, a marked
tendency towards mass violence, either sanctioned, or colluded in, by
the state and the authorities; and third, the absence of Jewish
sovereignty, which meant that Jews as minority communities were
dependent for their security upon the states in which they lived.

Early Zionist thinkers had perhaps naively suggested that with sovereignty, anti-Jewish persecution would end, yet anti-Zionism became one form of the “new” antisemitism. Jews themselves contributed to the demonization of Zionism, a history described in detail in Robert Wistrich’s essay, “AntiZionism: From Critique to Delegitimization.” Exploring this theme further, Alvin H. Rosenfeld asks, “What Exactly is ‘Criticism of Israel’?” and Joel Fishmen examines “Anti-Zionism as Political Warfare.”

Other writers in this volume look at specific areas of the world in which anti-Jewish rhetoric, activism (as with the Boycott, Divest, and Sanction movement), and deadly violence have taken place. Melanie Phillips, Bat Ye’or, Manfred Gerstenfeld, and Lesley Klaff review the situation in Europe, citing specific cases. R. Amy Elman points up the failure of the European Union to deal effectively with antisemitism. Maurice Samuels and Michel Gurfinkiel focus on France. Milton Shain reviews the situation in South . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.