A History of Modern England - Vol. 3

A History of Modern England - Vol. 3

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A History of Modern England - Vol. 3

A History of Modern England - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

Synopsis

“Mr. Paul has, no doubt, his personal and historical predilections, and he has a faculty of keen and even biting expression which now and then lets his readers see that the author’s feelings are warmly aroused, but it is only just to say that throughout these two volumes he hardly ever allows his own political or philosophical convictions to lead him into any injustice when he is estimating the qualities, or studying the purposes, of public men. The narrative throughout flows on with smooth and bright rapidity, and Mr. Paul is master of a very happy and a highly cultured style. The reader feels that he is listening to a man who has the faculty of making a story interesting, and knows at the same time that he has a very interesting story to tell. … I do not think I am indulging in any venturous prophecy when I predict for the book now opened by these two volumes an enduring and an authoritative place in historical literature.”

- JUSTIN MCCARTHY in THE DAILY CHRONICLE

Excerpt

The death of Keble in his seventy-fifth year left Dr. Pusey undisputed leader of the sacerdotal party in the Church of England. Although Keble, with all his austere and rigid dogmatism, had none of Pusey’s pugnacity, or controversial zeal, the beauty of his character, the simplicity of his life, and, above all, the singular influence of his ecclesiastical poems, gave him a commanding position with those who thought as he did of the Church, and there were pious souls who resorted to his vicarage at Hursley as to the oracle of God. Mr. Gladstone, whom Keble always supported in politics, pronounced him to be not merely a poet, a scholar, and a saint, as he certainly was, but a philosopher, and “a person of most liberal mind.”1 This is going altogether beyond the mark. Keble was a man of the highest literary cultivation, and of exquisite natural taste. But he was no more a philosopher than Mr. Gladstone himself, and though he could see the political injustice of a purely Erastian institution, such as the Established Church of Ireland, he was not liberal enough to separate doctrinal error from moral obliquity. His loyal devotion to the Church of England was never shaken, and his indifference to all earthly rewards was at that time more conspicuous than it should have been in . . .
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