Rebellious Parents: Parental Movements in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia

Rebellious Parents: Parental Movements in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia

Rebellious Parents: Parental Movements in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia

Rebellious Parents: Parental Movements in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia

Synopsis

Parental activism movements are strengthening around the world and often spark tense personal and political debate. With an emphasis on Russia and Central and Eastern Europe, this collection analyzes formal organizations as well as informal networks and online platforms which mobilize parents to advocate for change on a grassroots level. In doing so, the work collected here explores the interactions between the politics, everyday life, and social activism of mothers and fathers. From fathers' rights movements to natural childbirth to vaccination debates, these essays provide new insight into the identities and strategies applied by these movements as they confront local ideals of gender and family with global ideologies.

Excerpt

This volume focuses on a broad range of parental movements that have emerged in contemporary Central-Eastern Europe and Russia over the past two decades. Examples of such movements include social mobilizations of conservative parental groups against legal and discursive changes that would affect gender equality in Ukraine and Russia, Czech parents opposing mandatory vaccination of children, and fathers’ groups in Poland and the Czech Republic focusing on custody rights. Parental activism is increasingly visible and influential, but it has been the subject of relatively little research to date (e.g., Caiazza 2002; Fábián 2013; Hryciuk and Korolczuk 2013; Jagudina 2009; Kok 2002; Wojnicka 2013). We aim to rectify this by analyzing what we have identified as representative cases of parental movements in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia. We hope to enrich and explain the current interpretations of social activism and civil society in the postcommunist region, which is often associated with a low level of social engagement and weak civil society, and to offer new conceptualization of mothers’ and fathers’ activism that may be applicable in other geographical contexts.

Our collection of essays aims to fill a gap in the scholarship on civil society and social movements that is both empirical and theoretical, presenting an entirely new set of observations on the developments in contemporary parental activism in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia and proposing new . . .

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