The Eternal Savage: Nu of the Neocene

The Eternal Savage: Nu of the Neocene

The Eternal Savage: Nu of the Neocene

The Eternal Savage: Nu of the Neocene

Synopsis

Time travel, a millennium-spanning romance, and rousing action in modern African jungles and the untamed prehistoric wilderness ignite this classic adventure tale from the pen of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Nu, a warrior from the Stone Age, is buried alive in an earthquake while stalking a saber-toothed tiger. Awakening thousands of years later on Tarzan's estate in Africa, he gives his heart to Victoria Custer of Nebraska, a visitor to the estate, who is the reincarnation of Nu's Stone Age love, Nat-ul. But other men treacherously compete for the love of Victoria in modern Africa and for the heart of Nat-ul in the distant past. Set in both a terrifyingly dangerous primeval setting and the beloved world of Tarzan, The Eternal Savage movingly reveals whether eternal love is strong enough to triumph over undying adversity.

Excerpt

Tom Deitz

Let me say right up front that I had never read The Eternal Savage until prompted to do so by an invitation to write an introduction to this new edition. To begin my preparation I therefore did two things. the first was rather prosaic: I ran a quick check of the book’s publishing history so as to establish some kind of historical context for what I was about to assay. From this I learned that the tale, whose most recent paperback title was The Eternal Savage, had originally been published in two parts: the first part as “The Eternal Lover” in All-Story Weekly (7 March 1914), and the second as the serialized story “Sweetheart Primeval” in All-Story Cavalier Weekly (23 and 30 January, and 6 and 13 February 1915). the second thing I did was something I often do when confronted with an unfamiliar novel: I picked up the copy graciously supplied by this most recent Edgar Rice Burroughs publisher and chose a line at random, located roughly halfway through. This is what I read: “It was evident that Oo was far away, otherwise he would never have let Ur’s challenge go unanswered.” of course, I wanted more. I wanted to know who (or what) Oo was, and was equally curious about who (or what) Ur might be, and why he (for a being with a name like “Ur” must certainly be male in a Burroughs novel) was challenging this Oo.

But I made myself stop, determined to let Mr. Burroughs tell me in his own good time and fashion the nature of the conflict thus implicated. I have used this tactic before, and it is usually a good litmus test. If one can enter a story at random and want to . . .

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