American Militias: State-Level Variations in Militia Activities

American Militias: State-Level Variations in Militia Activities

American Militias: State-Level Variations in Militia Activities

American Militias: State-Level Variations in Militia Activities

Synopsis

Joshua D. Freilich is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the John Jay college of Criminal Justice. He received a J.D. from Brooklyn Law School in 1993 and a Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the University at Albany in 2001. His research interests include deviance and far-right social movements and international and comparative criminology and criminal justice issues.

Excerpt

The militia movement first entered the consciousness of American society in the Spring of 1995, following the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building in Oklahoma City (see for e.g., Barkun 1997; Bennett 1995; Chermak 2002; Dees and Corcoran 1996; Duffy and Brantley 1997; Dyer 1997; Hamm 1997; Karl 1995; Pitcavage 1998a; 2001; Stern 1996). That terrorist incident, which ultimately claimed 168 lives, awakened America to a social movement that had been operating in obscurity on the fringes of American social and political life. For days, months, and even years following the Oklahoma City bombing, the media and others linked the perpetrators (i.e., Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols) to the militia movement (see for e.g., Barkun 1997; Chermak 2002; Duffy and Brantley 1997; Hamilton 1996; Hamm 1997; Karl 1995).

The militia movement was subsequently accused of involvement in a number of other crimes, both high profile and otherwise (e.g., the October 1994 shooting outside of the White House, the fatal Fall 1995 sabotage of Amtrak lines in the West, and the deadly 1996 bombing in Atlanta during the Summer Olympics). in addition, a number of militia members throughout the country were arrested by various law enforcement agencies in connection with several planned terrorist incidents (see for e.g., Chermak 2002; Dees and Corcoran 1996, Hilliard and Keith 1999; Jakes, Jakes and Richmond 1998; Karl 1995; Snow 1999; Stanton 2002; the Militia Watchdog Organization 1997; 1998; 1999). in the Spring of 2002, for instance, a militia member from Montana was . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.