The Foreign Policies of the Global South: Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks

The Foreign Policies of the Global South: Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks

The Foreign Policies of the Global South: Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks

The Foreign Policies of the Global South: Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks

Synopsis

Seeking to refocus thinking about the behavior of the global south (third world) states in international affairs, this book explores contending explanations of global south foreign policy and strategy. The authors draw on both traditional approaches and newer conceptualizations in foreign policy analysis, contributing to the development of an integrated theoretical framework. Examples from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Arab world enrich the analysis.

Excerpt

The aim of this book is to refocus the attention of foreign policy scholars on the theoretical relevance of the states that together make up twothirds of the global community: “third world countries” or, more appropriately today, the “countries of the global south.” the avenue chosen for this refocusing is the field of foreign policy, which from its genesis as a separate subfield of international relations has arguably had an inherent bias toward the study of “developed Western states.” in the twenty-first century, the field itself is being reconceptualized in light of the decline of state power, the rise of nonstate actors, and the inexorable forces of globalization and transnationalization. Although many recognize that the third world is at the heart of various policy problematiques today (ranging from terrorism to trade), scholars are less likely than before to consider third world countries as having theoretical relevance to the foreign policy—if not the entire international relations—enterprise. But given the great global changes that have impacted the study of international relations and foreign policy, the time seems ripe for considering whether and in what way the external strategies of the majority of the world’s nations have changed—in other words, how these nations are dealing with globalization, liberalization, and the transnationalization of issues, society, and economies. Although in some ways third world nations still seem to cling to older perspectives on the role of the state and state power, as well as inequality and dependency, they have also had to modify their approaches to incorporate new realities. the contributors to this volume therefore wish to look back—at theoretical attempts to incorporate third world activity—as well as . . .

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