The Art of Winning Commitment: 10 Ways Leaders Can Engage Minds, Hearts, and Spirits

The Art of Winning Commitment: 10 Ways Leaders Can Engage Minds, Hearts, and Spirits

The Art of Winning Commitment: 10 Ways Leaders Can Engage Minds, Hearts, and Spirits

The Art of Winning Commitment: 10 Ways Leaders Can Engage Minds, Hearts, and Spirits

Synopsis

Leadership books most often cite interviews with high-profile business executives while offering do-and-don't case studies of different corporate initiatives in action. But some of the world's most extraordinary leaders work their magic outside the world of business. Their ability to gain the enthusiastic commitment of their people -- when something other, and perhaps greater, than profit is at stake -- demonstrates a fundamental human connection that their counterparts in the corporate sector would do well to emulate.

The Art of Winning Commitment presents the unique perspectives of a diverse group of leaders that includes:

• educators

• religious and spiritual leaders

• heads of not-for-profit social services

• an orchestra conductor

• a professional storyteller

Readers will also learn leadership secrets from former Philadelphia 76ers' executive Pat Croce, former Chief of the Cherokee Nation Wilma Mankiller, and politician and retired U.S. Army General Wesley Clark, and others.

In the search for commitment, loyalty, and business excellence, leaders can learn a lot from those outside of the business definition of leadership.

Excerpt

On May 22, 1782, just six years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Army Colonel Lewis Nicola, frustrated by the inability of the fledgling American Congress to raise funds to pay the army, wrote to President George Washington urging him to become king of the United States. Washington’s refusal was adamant. He wrote back to Nicola on the same day: “If you have any regard for your country, concern for yourself or posterity, or respect for me … banish these thoughts from your mind, and never communicate, as from yourself, or any one else, a sentiment of the like nature.”

Nicola’s desire for a sovereign ruler and Washington’s rebuff reflect the early stages of a shift in human consciousness, and a revolution in human expectations about leadership. Nicola’s urgings were in tune with previous human experience and with the inclination of human con-

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