The Archaeology of Liberty in an American Capital: Excavations in Annapolis

The Archaeology of Liberty in an American Capital: Excavations in Annapolis

The Archaeology of Liberty in an American Capital: Excavations in Annapolis

The Archaeology of Liberty in an American Capital: Excavations in Annapolis

Synopsis

What do archaeological excavations in Annapolis, Maryland, reveal about daily life in the city's history? Considering artifacts such as ceramics, spirit bundles, printer's type, and landscapes, this engaging, generously illustrated, and original study illuminates the lives of the city's residents--walking, seeing, reading, talking, eating, and living together in freedom and in oppression for more than three hundred years. Interpreting the results of one of the most innovative projects in American archaeology, The Archaeology of Liberty in an American Capital speaks powerfully to the struggle for liberty among African Americans and the poor.

Excerpt

Although the idea in this book is my own, and I am responsible for how it is played out and the possibilities for a view of history that it creates, my former students and current colleagues contributed in important ways to the project of making Annapolis archaeology contribute to understanding the history of our country. Paul A. Shackel, Barbara J. Little, Parker B. Potter Jr., and Elizabeth B. Kryder-Reid wrote big and groundbreaking dissertations on Annapolis through Archaeology in Annapolis. Paul R. Mullins, Mark S. Warner, Eric Larsen and Hannah Jopling explored African America. Christopher N. Matthews made the nineteenth century a problem by showing how Annapolis modernized behind the mark of historic preservation. and Matthew Palus made understanding the twentieth century into a problem by studying the use of public utilities to create a dependent suburb out of a freestanding town and also archaeology as an activity that could be regulated by government to control property value. Jennifer Babiarz took us out of Annapolis and onto Wye Island to follow William Paca, as has Lisa Kraus. I borrowed heavily from all of them.

There were two recruiting environments from which students came to Archaeology in Annapolis. the Department of Anthropology runs an annual archaeological f20095273

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