Persuasion, Reflection, Judgment: Ancillae Vitae

Persuasion, Reflection, Judgment: Ancillae Vitae

Persuasion, Reflection, Judgment: Ancillae Vitae

Persuasion, Reflection, Judgment: Ancillae Vitae

Synopsis

As one of the most respected voices of Continental philosophy today, Rodolphe Gasche pulls together Aristotle's conception of rhetoric, Martin Heidegger's debate with theory, and Hannah Arendt's conception of judgment in a single work on the centrality of these themes as fundamental to human flourishing in public and political life. Gasche's readings address the distinctively human space of the public square and the actions that occur there, and his valorization of persuasion, reflection, and judgment reveals new insight into how the philosophical tradition distinguishes thinking from other faculties of the human mind.

Excerpt

Each of the three sections of this book—on persuasion in Aristotle, reflection (Besinnung) in Martin Heidegger, and judgment in Hannah Arendt—comes with its own introduction. Each section can, thus, be read on its own and without regard for the order in which it is presented. Yet, apart from the fact that the order in which these studies follow one another is chronological, the essays, though they do not explicitly build upon or derive from one another, are interrelated in many ways and, ultimately, pursue one question, one major concern. These prefatory remarks, which I keep to a minimum, are intended to explain this common concern and to sketch out, however schematically, the ways in which the essays might relate to one another.

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