Political Culture in Spanish America, 1500-1830

Political Culture in Spanish America, 1500-1830

Political Culture in Spanish America, 1500-1830

Political Culture in Spanish America, 1500-1830

Synopsis

Political Culture in Spanish America, 1500-1830 examines the nature of Spanish American political culture by reevaluating the political theory, institutions, and practices of the Hispanic world. Consisting of eight case studies with a focus on New Spain and Quito, Jaime E. Rodriguez O. demonstrates that the process of independence of Spanish America differs from previous claims.

In 1188 King Alfonso IX convened the Cortes, the first congress in Europe that included the three estates: the clergy, the nobility, and the towns. This heritage, along with events in the sixteenth century, including the rebellion of Castilla and the Protestant Reformation, transformed the nature of Hispanic political thought. Rodriguez O. argues that those developments, rather than the Enlightenment, were the basis of the Hispanic revolution and the Constitution of 1812. Emphasizing continuity rather than the rejection of Hispanic political culture, and including the Atlantic perspective, Political Culture in Spanish America, 1500-1830 demonstrates the nature of the Hispanic revolution and the process of independence. Rodriguez O.'s work will encourage historians of Spanish America to reexamine the political institutions and processes of those nations from a broad perspective to gain a deeper understanding of the Spanish American countries that emerged from the breakup of the composite monarchy.

Excerpt

During my career I have published numerous articles and book chapters in Europe and the Western Hemisphere. Although the majority of these publications are in Spanish, they are not widely known outside of the country of publication. Since my work focuses primarily on Mexico, I know a number of scholars in that country. Some of these colleagues have noted that many of my articles and book chapters are not available to scholars and to students. José Antonio Serrano Ortega, then professor and now president at El Colegio de Michoacán, a distinguished center for graduate studies and research, proposed that his institution publish a select group of my essays dealing with political culture. Mariana Terán Fuentes, an eminent scholar at the Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, read the manuscript and recommended it for publication. As a result, nineteen essays were published in 2015 in two volumes entitled “Lo político” en el mundo Hispánico. I received advance copies in time to take two sets to the Rocky Mountain Conference on Latin American Studies (RMCLAS). Various colleagues suggested that a smaller English version be published. Bill Beezley encouraged me to prepare a book that discussed aspects of Hispanic political culture that are not well known in the Anglophone world. I am grateful for his encouragement. Bridget Barry, acquisitions editor for history, geography and environmental studies of the University of Nebraska Press, expressed an interest in the project and sent it out for review. I am also grateful to the two anonymous scholars who read the manuscript and offered valuable suggestions for impheir advice but I considered it seriously. My greatest debt is to my colleague, friend, and wife, Linda Alexander Rodríguez. She read the present work in all its versions and offered valuable suggestions that helped clarify and enrich my analysis of political culture in the Hispanic world.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.