Disappointment: Toward a Critical Hermeneutics of Worldbuilding

Disappointment: Toward a Critical Hermeneutics of Worldbuilding

Disappointment: Toward a Critical Hermeneutics of Worldbuilding

Disappointment: Toward a Critical Hermeneutics of Worldbuilding

Excerpt

If it is the case that philosophy begins with disappointment, then politics must be the most philosophical of all human endeavors. Politics, which in this book I define as agonistic and creative experimentation with an otherwise, begins not merely with the disappointment of our inability to know, understand, or grasp the world, but with the overwhelming disappointment that a world has become unbearable. When one can no longer dwell in the world in which one is, then two choices remain: either wait and hope against hope that something, somehow, might get a little better; or act. To act in an unbearable world is to act agonistically, since it is likely the case that something (thing here is meant in the broadest possible manner) must be acted against and changed in order to allow one to dwell again. To act in this manner is also creative and experimental, since prior to such political action there is no way of knowing or conceiving how one can act and what kind of action will be successful. Such political action is, as Giorgio Agamben might put it, a politics of a “means without an end.” the creative and experimental nature of political action is doubly so inresult is not having been folded into, or included in, or . . .

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