The Global South Atlantic

The Global South Atlantic

The Global South Atlantic

The Global South Atlantic

Synopsis

Not only were more African slaves transported to South America than to North, but overlapping imperialisms and shared resistance to them have linked Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean for over five centuries. Yet despite the rise in transatlantic, oceanic, hemispheric, and regional studies, and even the growing interest in South-South connections, the South Atlantic has not yet emerged as a site that captures the attention it deserves.

The Global South Atlantic traces literary exchanges and interlaced networks of communication and investment--financial, political, socio-cultural, libidinal--across and around the southern ocean. Bringing together scholars working in a range of languages, from Spanish to Arabic, the book shows the range of ways people, governments, political movements, social imaginaries, cultural artefacts, goods, and markets cross the South Atlantic, or sometimes fail to cross.

As a region made up of multiple intersecting regions, and as a vision made up of complementary and competing visions, the South Atlantic can only be understood comparatively. Exploring the Atlantic as an effect of structures of power and knowledge that issue from the Global South as much as from Europe and North America, The Global South Atlantic helps to rebalance global literary studies by making visible a multi-textured South Atlantic system that is neither singular nor stable.

Excerpt

When Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt made their Joint Declaration of “hopes for a better future of the world” from a warship off the coast of Newfoundland on August 14, 1941, they were not thinking about the South Atlantic. They were anticipating a formal North Atlantic Anglo-American military alliance against German aggression and looking forward to a postwar peace that might, in the Charter’s words, “afford assurance that all the men in all the lands may live out their lives in freedom from fear and want,” based on principles of “sovereign rights and self government” and “the right of all peoples to choose the form of government under which they will live.” the Joint Declaration, released to the press by cablegram and delivered to the world by radio operators aboard the ships, was quickly dubbed the “Atlantic Charter,” lending the name of the sea that both separated and united the United States and the United Kingdom to oceanic principles of liberty and peace intended to inspire (potential) allies and to reassure others of the justness of their war019s grand rhetorical commitments to the rights of “all the men in all the lands” to territorial sovereignty and democratic governance would be cited as the “common program of purposes and principles”

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.