Elizabeth Sinkler Coxe's Tales from the Grand Tour, 1890-1910

Elizabeth Sinkler Coxe's Tales from the Grand Tour, 1890-1910

Elizabeth Sinkler Coxe's Tales from the Grand Tour, 1890-1910

Elizabeth Sinkler Coxe's Tales from the Grand Tour, 1890-1910

Synopsis

Elizabeth Sinkler Coxe's Tales from the Grand Tour, 1890-1910 is a travelogue of captivating adventures through exotic lands as experienced by an intrepid American aristocrat and her son at the dawn of the twentieth century. A member of the prominent Sinkler family of Charleston and Philadelphia, Elizabeth Lizzie Sinkler married into Philadelphia's wealthy Coxe family in 1870. Widowed just three years later, she dedicated herself to a lifelong pursuit of philanthropy, intellectual endeavor, and extensive travel. Heeding the call of their adventuresome spirits, Lizzie and her son Eckley set sail in 1890 on a series of odysseys from the United States to Cairo, Luxor, Khartoum, Algiers, Istanbul, Naples, Vichy, and Athens. Like many of their peers in the upper echelons of American society, this wealthy duo were drawn into the Egyptian craze that swept late-nineteenth-century society, and they fully immersed themselves in the nascent field of scientific archaeology.

Excerpt

Elizabeth Sinkler Coxe’s Tales from the Grand Tour, 1890–1910, expertly edited by Anne Sinkler Whaley LeClercq, is the twenty-third volume in what had been the Women’s Diaries and Letters of the NineteenthCentury South series. This series has been redefined and is now titled Women’s Diaries and Letters of the South, enabling us to include some remarkably fine works from the twentieth century. This series includes a number of never-before-published diaries, some collections of unpublished correspondence, and a few reprints of published diaries—a pot pour ri of nineteenth-century and, now, twentieth-century Southern women’s writings.

The series enables women to speak for themselves, providing readers with a rarely opened window into Southern society before, during, and after the American Civil War and into the twentieth century. the significance of these letters and journals lies not only in the personal revelations and the writing talent of these women authors but also in the range and versatility of the documents’ contents. Taken together, these publications will tell us much about the heyday and the fall of the Cotton Kingdom, the mature years of the “peculiar institution,” the war years, the adjustment of the South to a new social order following the defeat of the Confederacy, and the New South of the twentieth century. Through these writings, the reader will also be presented with firsthand accounts of everyday life and social events, courtships and marriages, family life and travels, religion and education, and the life-and-death matters that made up the ordinary and extraordinary world of the American South.

Anne LeClercq has woven together materials from a number of sources to tell a story of a remarkable American woman at the turn of the twentieth century. Elizabeth Sinkler Coxe was born on a plantation in South Caro lina, grew up during the Civil War, married a northerner, was left a . . .

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