The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church - Vol. 7

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church - Vol. 7

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church - Vol. 7

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church - Vol. 7

Synopsis

This magisterial volume is the seventh and last of Hughes Oliphant Old's history of preaching. Here Old takes up the story with the sixties and the Second Vatican Council and follows it all the way through to the house churches of China and the preaching of the Archbishop of Uganda, known as the "Billy Graham of Africa." Along the way he looks at the engaging preaching found in Latin America, the rise of the modern megachurch, the role of Joan Alexandru's preaching in bringing down the house of Ceausescu, and other historically significant moments in preaching. / Full of surprising details and inspiring stories of ministry, this book is a fitting work to round out Old's monumental, comprehensive series written by a preacher for preachers on the history of preaching in the Christian church.

Excerpt

It seems to me that a new age of preaching began in the closing decades of the twentieth century. What we have called the modern age came to its manifest end in the sixties, at least as far as the mainline American pulpit was concerned. As James I. McCord, president of Princeton Theological Seminary, said to me back in 1985 when I started this project, the great pulpits of America are embarrassed at being unable to find successors to the giants they once knew. By the late eighties it had become a popular refrain, “Where have all the preachers gone?”

By the nineties, however, there began to be rumors that some very strong young preachers could be heard in some quite unexpected places. It was preaching with a somewhat different ring to it, however. Sometimes it sounded downright fundamentalist and sometimes it sounded almost charismatic, but most of all it had a strong expository structure. Preaching through the Bible was regaining popularity. Not much expository preaching had been heard during the first half of the twentieth century, and even less in the nineteenth century. the few who did expository preaching usually did it like Charles Haddon Spurgeon, one isolated verse at a time. Systematic expository preaching at first sounded like some sort of novelty. in Britain the lead was being taken by Martyn Lloyd-Jones, William Still, and John Stott, while the American version was led by Earl Palmer, right across the street from the University of California campus at Berkeley, Chuck Swindoll at an Evangelical Free Church in Orange County, and Chuck Smith, chaplain to the “Jesus freaks” at Costa Mesa.

It was not so much a preaching revolution that took place in these . . .

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