Yet One More Spring: A Critical Study of Joy Davidman

Yet One More Spring: A Critical Study of Joy Davidman

Yet One More Spring: A Critical Study of Joy Davidman

Yet One More Spring: A Critical Study of Joy Davidman

Synopsis

Joy Davidman (1915-1960) is probably best known today as the woman that C. S. Lewis married in the last decade of his life. But she was also an accomplished writer in her own right -- an awardwinning poet and a prolific book, theater, and film reviewer during the late 1930s and early 1940s.Yet One More Spring is the first comprehensive critical study of Joy Davidman's poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. Don King studies her body of work -- including both published and unpublished works -- chronologically, tracing her development as a writer and revealing Davidman's literary influence on C. S. Lewis. King also shows how Davidman's work reflects her religious and intellectual journey from secular Judaism to atheism to Communism to Christianity.Drawing as it does on a cache of previously unknown manuscripts of Davidman's work, Yet One More Spring brings to light the work of a very gifted but largely overlooked American writer.

Excerpt

In some ways it is unfortunate that Joy Davidman (1915-1960) is best known as the woman C. S. Lewis married in the last decade of his life. Davidman’s relationship with Lewis has been explored on multiple levels, perhaps most famously in the 1993 film Shadowlands, starring Anthony Hopkins and Deborah Winger. While this attention has kept her name in the public eye, Lewis’s reputation has obscured Davidman’s own accomplishments as a writer. Although her letters, collected in Out of My Bone: the Letters of Joy Davidman (2009), have shed new light on important biographical details of Davidman’s life, Yet One More Spring brings Davidman out of Lewis’s shadow through an analytical study of her poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Davidman was an award-winning poet; in 1938 she received the Russell Loines Memorial award for poetry, given by the National Institute of Arts and Letters, for her Letter to a Comrade (1938). Her poems also appeared in journals such as Poetry: a Magazine of Verse; Accent: a Quarterly of New Literature; Fantasy: a Literary Quarterly with an Emphasis on Poetry; New Masses; New Republic; and in two book collections of verse: Seven Poets in Search of an Answer (1944), and War Poems of the United Nations (1943). She also published two novels, Anya (1940) and Weeping Bay (1950). in addition, she was a prolific book, theater, and film reviewer during the late 1930s and early 1940s for the New Masses, the semi-official magazine of the Communist Party of the United States of America. Her last book, Smoke on the Mountain: An Interpretation of the Ten Commandments (1955), is a fascinating exploration of the Decalogue. Despite this body of work, little critical work has been done on Davidman. For instance, there is no booklength study of her work, the few articles and reviews of her work are very . . .

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