The Admirals: Canada's Senior Naval Leadership in the Twentieth Century

The Admirals: Canada's Senior Naval Leadership in the Twentieth Century

The Admirals: Canada's Senior Naval Leadership in the Twentieth Century

The Admirals: Canada's Senior Naval Leadership in the Twentieth Century

Synopsis

The Admirals: Canada's Senior Naval Leadership in the Twentieth Century fills an important void in the history of Canada's navy. Those who carry the burden of high command have a critical niche in not only guiding the day-to-day concerns of running an armed service but in ensuring that it is ready to face the challenges of the future. Canada's leading naval historians present analytical articles on the officers who led the navy from its foundation in 1910 to the unification in 1968. Six former Maritime Commanders provide personal reflections on command. The result is a valuable biographical compendium for anyone interested in the history of the Canadian Navy, the Canadian Forces, or military and naval leadership in general.

Excerpt

It was my pleasure and privilege to attend the Sixth Maritime Command Historical Conference in Halifax in 2002, the proceedings of which this volume records.

Canada’s foremost naval historians presented a range of biographical and professional studies of the Chiefs of the Naval Staff and other influential Royal Canadian Navy senior officers from our founding in 1910, through the world wars and inter-war years, Korea and the Cold War, to our transformation in 1968. the scope of these scholarly enquiries is thus comprehensive; they are of sufficient depth and originality to provide us with genuinely new insights into an important part of modern Canadian history.

Most fascinating to me were the reminiscences of six of my predecessors, retired Commanders of Maritime Command, including Admirals Timbrell, Porter, Fulton, Thomas, George and Anderson. Their participation added a credible degree of relevance to the proceedings.

This volume outlines and examines the challenges associated with senior naval leadership within the sometimes fraught context of Canadian federal politics as well as period strategic geopolitics. It offers a valuable collection of case studies into the nature of leadership, from which present and future naval personnel (and, I would hope, those who aspire to a career in politics) can learn a great deal.

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