Facing It: Epiphany and Apocalypse in the New Nature

Facing It: Epiphany and Apocalypse in the New Nature

Facing It: Epiphany and Apocalypse in the New Nature

Facing It: Epiphany and Apocalypse in the New Nature

Synopsis

Blending memoir, cultural history, and a literary perspective, Facing It bears witness to controversies like Tellico and Chernobyl, global warming and local drought. But rather than merely drowning readers in waves of ecological angst, M. Jimmie Killingsworth seeks alternative images and episodes to invoke presence without crippling the hope for survival and sustenance in places and communities of value.

In deft, highly accessible prose, Killingsworth takes the reader through a Cold-War childhood, an adolescence colored by anti-war and ecological activism, and an adulthood darkened by terrorism and climate change. Inviting us on walks through tame suburbias (riddled with environmental abuse) and wild deserts and mountains (shadowed by industrial development), he celebrates the survival of natural beauty and people living close to the earth while questioning truisms associated with both economic advancement and environmental purity.

Above all, this book invites the reader to face it: to look with wide-open eyes on a new nature that will never be the same, but that continues to offer opportunities for renewal and advancement of life.

Excerpt

Global warming, species decimation, habitat loss, pollution of the rivers and oceans, runaway urbanization, worldwide terrorism, displacement of whole populations by war and wild weather, environmental engineering projects that touch the very composition of the atmosphere—this is not your grandmother’s world. the old books on environmental pollution and protection, written in the 1960s and 1970s—Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, Paul Ehrlich’s The Population Bomb, the Club of Rome’s Limits to Growth—became famous for prophesying doom in the wake of postwar growth and development. We need to change the course of human history, they said, or suffer the consequences. the latest books on the environmental crises have gone further. the new books—Bill McKibben’s Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet, Timothy Morton’s The Ecological Thought, Frances Moore Lappé’s Eco-Mind: Changing the Way We Think, to Create the World We Want, Ian Angus and Simon Butler’s Too Many People?: Population, Immigration, and the Environmental Crisis, Clive Hamilton’s Requiem for a Species, and Mark Lynas’s The God Species: Saving the Planet in the Age of Humans, all published within a single year (2010–11)—differ widely in their views of the nature and causes of the problems we face. the solutions they propose range from downsizing and living close to the earth in small, decentralized communities to urbanizing and reengineering the earth on a . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.