Demystifying Communications Risk: A Guide to Revenue Risk Management in the Communications Sector

Demystifying Communications Risk: A Guide to Revenue Risk Management in the Communications Sector

Demystifying Communications Risk: A Guide to Revenue Risk Management in the Communications Sector

Demystifying Communications Risk: A Guide to Revenue Risk Management in the Communications Sector

Synopsis

The rapid pace and increasing convergence of internet, phone and other communications technologies has created extraordinary opportunities for business but the complexity of these new service mixes creates parallel opportunities for fraud and revenue leakage. Companies seeking to use communications technology as a delivery or payment platform for digital services are particularly at risk. They need to understand both their strategic and operational risks as well as those affecting their stakeholders - partners and customers. Effective risk management is as much about awareness, culture, training and organization as it is about technology. Mark Johnson's practical guide, Demystifying Communications Risk, highlights cases from a wide range of geographies and cultures and is designed to raise awareness of the multi-faceted and often complex forms that operational revenue risks take in the communications sector. It provides managers with an understanding of the nature and implications of the risks they face and the human, organizational and technological approaches that can help avoid or mitigate them.

Excerpt

Foreword
By Lord Toby Harris

Demystifying Communications Risk

Towards the end of 2004, I started asking questions in the House of Lords about how secure the UK’s critical national infrastructure was against cyber attack and even initiated a short debate on the subject. the Ministerial responses were always reassuring, if bland. the assessment – I was told – was that the risks were not high and that in any case there were robust arrangements in place to deal with any eventualities.

I was not convinced, tabled more questions, and began asking regularly how many computers had been compromised in each government department in the previous year. the answers were fairly meaningless but it was disconcerting to hear – implausibly – that most departments had not been aware of any problems at all.

I knew that things had changed and that the issue was now at least being taken seriously, when after a couple of years, the responses changed to a blanket refusal to answer on the basis that supplying such information might be helpful to the country’s enemies.

In 2010 cyber attacks on infrastructure appeared in the National Risk Register accompanying the National Security Strategy and now, of course, ‘hostile attacks upon uk cyber space by other states and large scale cyber crime’ appear as one of the four Tier One risks in the latest version of that Strategy.

However, I suspect that for many businesses – even now – awareness of cyber risk is rather like that of the uk government in 2004: they do not see it as a major threat and anyway they believe they are adequately protected. Too . . .

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