Translation and the Arts in Modern France

Translation and the Arts in Modern France

Translation and the Arts in Modern France

Translation and the Arts in Modern France

Synopsis

Translation and the Arts in Modern France sits at the intersection of transposition, translation, and ekphrasis, finding resonances in these areas across periods, places, and forms. Within these contributions, questions of colonization, subjugation, migration, and exile connect Benin to Brittany, and political philosophy to the sentimental novel and to film. Focusing on cultural production from 1830 to the present and privileging French culture, the contributors explore interactions with other cultures, countries, and continents, often explicitly equating intercultural permeability with representational exchange. In doing so, the book exposes the extent to which moving between media and codes--the very process of translation and transposition--is a defining aspect of creativity across time, space, and disciplines.

Excerpt

In one of her first publications, rosemary lloyd INcluded as an epigraph a quotation from a letter written by Baudelaire. the correspondence in question charges Julien Lemer with selling Les paradis artificiels (Artificial Paradises) and some other works of criticism, and is dated February 23, 1865. Her citation of Baudelaire in 1981 was a reflexive gesture, evoking a shared critical motivation: “J’ai une assez vive envie de montrer ce que j’ai su faire en matière de critique” (I have a very keen desire to show you what I have done as a critic). in 2007, the year in which the same handwritten letter was sold for twice its estimated price by Christie’s, Rosemary retired from Indiana University, having more than demonstrated her own worth to the critical enterprise, and in a career spanning three continents, three decades, and more disciplines. Central to Rosemary’s identity as a scholar has been her commitment to translation and to the question of intermediality. She has translated Baudelaire’s letters and prose poems, as well as Mallarmé’s correspondence and George Sand’s Master Pipers, and continues her work in this area. She has worked on still life, women writers, jealousy, and childhood, rooted in nineteenth-century France, but almost always with a comparative and intermedial perspective.

The essays in this volume were written with a desire to honor Rosemary Lloyd’s critical legacy and interests. Some of the scholars were former students, all were colleagues, and all learned from their work and interactions with Rosemary. This volume is dedicated to her, as was the conference that crystallized these ideas, because collectively we had the . . .

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